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dc.contributor.authorBesson, Madeleine
dc.contributor.authorGurviez, Patricia
dc.contributor.authorCarins, Julia
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-08T00:12:02Z
dc.date.available2020-09-08T00:12:02Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.issn2042-6763
dc.identifier.doi10.1108/JSOCM-07-2019-0115
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/397112
dc.description.abstractPurpose: When fighting the burden of overweight and obesity, diet remains a powerful preventive factor. The purpose of this paper is to stimulate more efficient interventions on diet change by synthesising knowledge of previous weight loss programmes based on the use of digital devices. Design/methodology/approach: Following the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses approach, a systematic literature review through five databases was undertaken focussed on the assessment of studies oriented towards diet change that incorporated digital devices including computers, tablets, mobile phones, portable and non-portable tracking devices. In total, 15 empirical studies (2004–2018) were identified and examined for efficacy and presence of theory and behaviour change techniques. Findings: Digital devices supporting weight loss programmes have evolved rapidly over the past 15 years, from reminders using the short message system to self-quantification through mobile applications. Nine studies show a significant difference between conditions, in favour or one (or more) intervention arm. The remaining studies failed to find significance between conditions but were using a comparison with an active intervention, potentially indicating equivalent efficacy. A low level of theory use and use of behavioural techniques was evident. Research limitations/implications: The literature review is limited to studies that have scientifically evaluated the (potential) weight loss associated with the weight loss intervention. This review could be put into perspective with other complementary research, in particular, qualitative research aimed at exploring participants’ motivations to use (or not) digital devices to lose weight. Social implications: Given their low cost and the size of the overweight population, it appears that public health policies could integrate digital devices more strongly in their efforts to combat obesity. Social marketing can add its expertise to medical-based programmes which in return bring their need for more quantitative evaluation of the efficacy of the interventions. Originality/value: Few previous reviews have examined the extent of the efficiency in digital diet change programmes. The review shows that, in general, digital interventions can support weight loss for adults; however, more studies are required to provide a strong evidence base for efficacy. Given their low cost and the size of the overweight population, public health policies could integrate these devices more strongly in their efforts to combat obesity. A theory-driven social marketing perspective could enhance development ensuring interventions are effective and valued by users.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherEmerald Publishing Limited
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Social Marketing
dc.subject.fieldofresearchSociology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchSocial marketing
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode4410
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode350612
dc.subject.keywordsSocial Sciences
dc.subject.keywordsBusiness & Economics
dc.subject.keywordsPublic health
dc.subject.keywordsObesity
dc.titleUsing digital devices to help people lose weight: a systematic review
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationBesson, M; Gurviez, P; Carins, J, Using digital devices to help people lose weight: a systematic review, Journal of Social Marketing, 2020,
dc.date.updated2020-09-06T23:51:08Z
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript (AM)
gro.description.notepublicThis publication has been entered in Griffith Research Online as an advanced online version.
gro.rights.copyright© 2020 Emerald. This is the author-manuscript version of this paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorCarins, Julia E.


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