Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorDi Bella, Alexandra L
dc.contributor.authorComans, Tracy
dc.contributor.authorGane, Elise M
dc.contributor.authorYoung, Adrienne M
dc.contributor.authorHickling, Donna F
dc.contributor.authorLucas, Alisha
dc.contributor.authorHickman, Ingrid J
dc.contributor.authorBanks, Merrilyn
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-23T03:35:48Z
dc.date.available2020-09-23T03:35:48Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.issn2227-9032en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/healthcare8030334en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/397835
dc.description.abstractDespite its high prevalence, there is no systematic approach to documenting and coding obesity in hospitals. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of obesity among inpatients, the proportion of obese patients recognised as obese by hospital administration, and the cost associated with their admission. A cross-sectional study was undertaken in three hospitals in Queensland, Australia. Inpatients present on three audit days were included in this study. Data collected were age, sex, height, and weight. Body mass index (BMI) was calculated in accordance with the World Health Organization's definition. Administrative data were sourced from hospital records departments to determine the number of patients officially documented as obese. Total actual costing data were sourced from hospital finance departments. From a combined cohort of n = 1327 inpatients (57% male, mean (SD) age: 61 (19) years, BMI: 28 (9) kg/m2), the prevalence of obesity was 32% (n = 421). Only half of obese patients were recognised as obese by hospital administration. A large variation in the cost of admission across BMI categories prohibited any statistical determination of difference. Obesity is highly prevalent among hospital inpatients in Queensland, Australia. Current methods of identifying obesity for administrative/funding purposes are not accurate and would benefit from reforms to measure the true impact of healthcare costs from obesity.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherMDPI AGen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom334en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto334en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue3en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalHealthcareen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume8en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic Health and Health Servicesen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1117en_US
dc.subject.keywordsbody mass indexen_US
dc.subject.keywordshealth care costsen_US
dc.subject.keywordshospital costsen_US
dc.subject.keywordshospitalsen_US
dc.subject.keywordsinpatientsen_US
dc.titleUnderreporting of Obesity in Hospital Inpatients: A Comparison of Body Mass Index and Administrative Documentation in Australian Hospitals.en_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articlesen_US
dcterms.bibliographicCitationDi Bella, AL; Comans, T; Gane, EM; Young, AM; Hickling, DF; Lucas, A; Hickman, IJ; Banks, M, Underreporting of Obesity in Hospital Inpatients: A Comparison of Body Mass Index and Administrative Documentation in Australian Hospitals., Healthcare, 2020, 8 (3), pp. 334-334en_US
dcterms.dateAccepted2020-09-09
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en_US
dc.date.updated2020-09-23T01:29:22Z
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)en_US
gro.rights.copyright© 2020 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.en_US
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorComans, Tracy


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record