Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorGeorge, Shane
dc.contributor.authorLong, Elliot
dc.contributor.authorGelbart, Ben
dc.contributor.authorDalziel, Stuart R
dc.contributor.authorBabl, Franz E
dc.contributor.authorSchibler, Andreas
dc.contributor.authorPaediatric Critical Care Research Group (PCCRG)
dc.contributor.authorAustralian and New Zealand Intensive Care Society Paediatric Study Group (ANZICS PSG)
dc.contributor.authorPaediatric Research in Emergency Departments International Collaborative (PREDICT) research networks
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-28T04:57:02Z
dc.date.available2020-09-28T04:57:02Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.issn1742-6731
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/1742-6723.13620
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/397980
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: Intubation of children in the emergency setting is a high-risk, low incidence event. Standardisation of clinical practice has been hampered by a lack of high-quality evidence to support one technique over another. The aim of the present study is to determine clinician preference in intubation practice of children in EDs and ICUs in Australia and New Zealand to provide baseline information to allow future targeted research focused on improving the safety and efficacy of paediatric emergency airway management. METHODS: The present study was a voluntary questionnaire undertaken by medical staff at registrar level or above in EDs and ICUs associated with the Paediatric Research in Emergency Departments International Collaborative (PREDICT) and Australia and New Zealand Intensive Care Society Paediatric Study Group (ANZICS PSG) research networks. Respondents reported on their individual intubation practices, with a focus on pre-oxygenation and apnoeic oxygenation techniques, and the use of video laryngoscopy. RESULTS: A total of 502 clinicians were invited to complete the survey between May and October 2018 with 336 (66.9%) responded. There was marked variation in practice between ED clinicians and ICU clinicians in the techniques used for pre-oxygenation, the frequency of use of apnoeic oxygenation and the reported use of video laryngoscopy. CONCLUSIONS: Within Australia and New Zealand there is considerable variation in paediatric emergency airway clinical practice, in particular with respect to pre-oxygenation, apnoeic oxygenation and use of video laryngoscopy. Definitive clinical trials are required to best inform clinical practice in this area.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherWiley
dc.relation.ispartofjournalEmergency Medicine Australasia
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic Health and Health Services
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1103
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1117
dc.subject.keywordsairway management
dc.subject.keywordsapnoeic oxygenation
dc.subject.keywordsintubation
dc.subject.keywordspaediatric
dc.subject.keywordspre-oxygenation
dc.titleIntubation practices for children in emergency departments and intensive care units across Australia and New Zealand: A survey of medical staff
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationGeorge, S; Long, E; Gelbart, B; Dalziel, SR; Babl, FE; Schibler, A; Paediatric Critical Care Research Group (PCCRG), Australian and New Zealand Intensive Care Society Paediatric Study Group (ANZICS PSG) and Paediatric Research in Emergency Departments International Collaborative (PREDICT) research networks, , Intubation practices for children in emergency departments and intensive care units across Australia and New Zealand: A survey of medical staff., Emergency Medicine Australasia, 2020
dcterms.dateAccepted2020-08-06
dc.date.updated2020-09-28T04:24:31Z
gro.description.notepublicThis publication has been entered into Griffith Research Online as an Advanced Online Version.
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorGeorge, Shane A.


Files in this item

FilesSizeFormatView

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record