Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorBillett, Stephenen_US
dc.contributor.authorDymock, Darrylen_US
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Greeren_US
dc.contributor.authorMartin, Gregen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T12:12:18Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T12:12:18Z
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.date.modified2012-09-14T01:59:37Z
dc.identifier.issn09585192en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/09585192.2011.559097en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/39802
dc.description.abstractIn advanced and developing economies, ageing populations and low birth rates are emphasising the need for retaining and sustaining competent older workers. This paper examines policy and practice implications from the contradictory accounts directed towards those workers aged over 44 years whom are usually classified as "older workers". It focuses on a key and paradoxical impediment in the retention of these workers in labour forces. That is, despite their increasing dependence on older workers, employers often position them as 'last resort' employees, hence inhibiting their access to employment, and the kinds of developmental opportunities and advancements afforded other categories of workers. Yet, in contrast, many older workers report being competent in their work; a view that is supported by other evidence. Using Australia as a case study, this paper argues that policies and practices to retain and sustain workers over 45 need to de-emphasise the term 'older workers' and reconsider how workplace environments and government policies, as well as practices by workers themselves, might pursue longer and more productive working lives for those aged over 45. It seeks to elaborate the paradox of the (under)valuing of older workers' contributions and provide direction for retaining and supporting the ongoing employability of these workers. It concludes by proposing that government, industry bodies and sector councils that seek to change employer attitudes will likely require a dual process comprising both engagement with older workers and a balanced appraisal of their worth. Alone, subsidies and/or mandation may well serve to entrench age bias without measures to redress that bias through a systematic appraisal of their current and potential contributions. In addition, to support this transformation of bias and sustain their employability, older workers will likely need to exercise greater agency in their work and learning.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.format.extent96992 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherRoutledgeen_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1248en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto1261en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue6en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalInternational Journal of Human Resource Managementen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume22en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEducation Systems not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode130199en_US
dc.titleOvercoming the paradox of employers' views about older workersen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, School of Education and Professional Studiesen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2011 Routledge. This is an electronic version of an article published in International Journal of Human Resource Management, Volume 22, Issue 6, pp. 1248-1261. International Journal of Human Resource Management is available online at: http://www.informaworld.com with the open URL of your article.en_US
gro.date.issued2011
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record