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dc.contributor.authorOliveira, Thiago R
dc.contributor.authorJackson, Jonathan
dc.contributor.authorMurphy, Kristina
dc.contributor.authorBradford, Ben
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-06T01:44:47Z
dc.date.available2020-10-06T01:44:47Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.issn0748-4518en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10940-020-09478-2en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/398102
dc.description.abstractObjectives: Test the asymmetry thesis of police-citizen contact that police trustworthiness and legitimacy are affected more by negative than by positive experiences of interactions with legal agents by analyzing changes in attitudes towards the police after an encounter with the police. Test whether prior attitudes moderate the impact of contact on changes in attitudes towards the police. Methods: A two-wave panel survey of a nationally representative sample of Australian adults measured people’s beliefs about police trustworthiness (procedural fairness and effectiveness), their duty to obey the police, their contact with the police between the two waves, and their evaluation of those encounters in terms of process and outcome. Analysis is carried out using autoregressive structural equation modeling and latent moderated structural models. Results: The association between both process and outcome evaluation of police-citizen encounters and changes in attitudes towards the police is asymmetrical for trust in police effectiveness, symmetrical for trust in procedural fairness, and asymmetrical (in the opposite direction expected) for duty to obey the police. Little evidence of heterogeneity in the association between encounters and trust in procedural fairness and duty to obey, but prior levels of perceived effectiveness moderate the association between outcome evaluation and changes in trust in police effectiveness. Conclusions: The association between police-citizen encounters and attitudes towards the police may not be as asymmetrical as previously thought, particularly for changes in trust in procedural fairness and legitimacy. Policy implications include considering public-police interactions as ‘teachable moments’ and potential sources for enhancing police trustworthiness and legitimacy.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherSpringer Science and Business Media LLCen_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Quantitative Criminologyen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCriminologyen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1602en_US
dc.titleAre Trustworthiness and Legitimacy ‘Hard to Win, Easy to Lose’? A Longitudinal Test of the Asymmetry Thesis of Police-Citizen Contacten_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articlesen_US
dcterms.bibliographicCitationOliveira, TR; Jackson, J; Murphy, K; Bradford, B, Are Trustworthiness and Legitimacy ‘Hard to Win, Easy to Lose’? A Longitudinal Test of the Asymmetry Thesis of Police-Citizen Contact, Journal of Quantitative Criminologyen_US
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en_US
dc.date.updated2020-10-02T02:12:00Z
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)en_US
gro.description.notepublicThis publication has been entered in Griffith Research Online as an advanced online version.en_US
gro.rights.copyright© The Author(s) 2020. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.en_US
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gro.griffith.authorMurphy, Kristina


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