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dc.contributor.authorAnanthapavan, Jaithri
dc.contributor.authorSacks, Gary
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Vicki
dc.contributor.authorMoodie, Marj
dc.contributor.authorNguyen, Phuong
dc.contributor.authorVeerman, Lennert
dc.contributor.authorHerrera, Ana Maria Mantilla
dc.contributor.authorLal, Anita
dc.contributor.authorPeeters, Anna
dc.contributor.authorCarter, Rob
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-07T09:28:13Z
dc.date.available2020-10-07T09:28:13Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0234804en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/398169
dc.description.abstractThe aim of the ACE-Obesity Policy study was to assess the economic credentials of a suite of obesity prevention policies across multiple sectors and areas of governance for the Australian setting. The study aimed to place the cost-effectiveness results within a broad decision-making context by providing an assessment of the key considerations for policy implementation. The Assessing Cost-Effectiveness (ACE) approach to priority-setting was used. Systematic literature reviews were undertaken to assess the evidence of intervention effectiveness on body mass index and/or physical activity for selected interventions. A standardised evaluation framework was used to assess the cost-effectiveness of each intervention compared to a ‘no intervention’ comparator, from a limited societal perspective. A multi-state life table Markov cohort model was used to estimate the long-term health impacts (quantified as health adjusted life years (HALYs)) and health care cost-savings resulting from each intervention. In addition to the technical cost-effectiveness results, qualitative assessments of implementation considerations were undertaken. All 16 interventions evaluated were found to be cost-effective (using a willingness-to-pay threshold of AUD50,000 per HALY gained). Eleven interventions were dominant (health promoting and cost-saving). The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for the non-dominant interventions ranged from AUD1,728 to 28,703 per HALY gained. Regulatory interventions tended to rank higher on their cost-effectiveness results, driven by lower implementation costs. However, the program-based policy interventions were generally based on higher quality evidence of intervention effectiveness. This comparative analysis of the economic credentials of obesity prevention policies for Australia indicates that there are a broad range of policies that are likely to be cost-effective, although policy options vary in strength of evidence for effectiveness, affordability, feasibility, acceptability to stakeholders, equity impact and sustainability. Implementation of these policies will require sustained co-ordination across jurisdictions and multiple government sectors in order to generate the predicted health benefits for the Australian population.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherPublic Library Scienceen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrome0234804en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue6en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalPLoS Oneen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume15en_US
dc.subject.keywordsScience & Technologyen_US
dc.subject.keywordsMultidisciplinary Sciencesen_US
dc.subject.keywordsScience & Technology - Other Topicsen_US
dc.subject.keywordsINTERVENTIONSen_US
dc.subject.keywordsADOLESCENTSen_US
dc.titlePriority-setting for obesity prevention-The Assessing Cost-Effectiveness of obesity prevention policies in Australia (ACE-Obesity Policy) studyen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articlesen_US
dcterms.bibliographicCitationAnanthapavan, J; Sacks, G; Brown, V; Moodie, M; Nguyen, P; Veerman, L; Herrera, AMM; Lal, A; Peeters, A; Carter, R, Priority-setting for obesity prevention-The Assessing Cost-Effectiveness of obesity prevention policies in Australia (ACE-Obesity Policy) study, PLoS One, 2020, 15 (6), pp. e0234804en_US
dcterms.dateAccepted2020-06-02
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en_US
dc.date.updated2020-10-07T09:24:04Z
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)en_US
gro.rights.copyright© 2020 Ananthapavan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.en_US
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorVeerman, Lennert L.


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