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dc.contributor.authorMaloney, Tim Ryan
dc.contributor.authorDilkes-Hall, India Ella
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-08T04:04:10Z
dc.date.available2020-10-08T04:04:10Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.issn0312-2417en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/03122417.2020.1816149en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/398224
dc.description.abstractOne of Indigenous Australia’s unique stone tools, the tula adze is traditionally viewed as a hafted woodworking tool of the arid zone. Unlike most stone tools in Australia and around the world, the spread and adoption of the tula adze has been described as rapid and instantaneous. The conditions which underlie this technological change are critically assessed in this study, using risk minimisation and diffusion models. The focus of the paper is a study area with unclear tula distribution—the southern Kimberley of Western Australia. The spatial distribution of these tools is reviewed and new discoveries outlined. Reduction sequences and morphological trends observed elsewhere are examined, and compared to the Kimberley record. Some of the archaeological sites analysed also preserve evidence of woodworking activities, such as wood shavings and wooden tools. We use these records, augmented by the association of hardwood species from macrobotanical records, to associate tulas with hardwood species availability in the late Holocene archaeological record of the Kimberley. We conclude that woodworking craft production proliferated in the late Holocene, as a likely result of both diffusion of information and foraging risk minimisation.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis Groupen_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalAustralian Archaeologyen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchArchaeologyen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchHistorical Studiesen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode2101en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode2103en_US
dc.subject.keywordsScience & Technologyen_US
dc.subject.keywordsSocial Sciencesen_US
dc.subject.keywordsLife Sciences & Biomedicineen_US
dc.subject.keywordsAnthropologyen_US
dc.titleAssessing the spread and uptake of tula adze technology in the late Holocene across the Southern Kimberley of Western Australiaen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articlesen_US
dcterms.bibliographicCitationMaloney, TR; Dilkes-Hall, IE, Assessing the spread and uptake of tula adze technology in the late Holocene across the Southern Kimberley of Western Australia, Australian Archaeology, 2020en_US
dc.date.updated2020-10-08T03:46:50Z
gro.description.notepublicThis publication has been entered in Griffith Research Online as an advanced online version.en_US
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorMaloney, Tim R.


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