Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorBurke, Heather
dc.contributor.authorWallis, Lynley A
dc.contributor.authorBarker, Bryce
dc.contributor.authorTutty, Megan
dc.contributor.authorCole, Noelene
dc.contributor.authorDavidson, Iain
dc.contributor.authorHatte, Elizabeth
dc.contributor.authorLowe, Kelsey
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-12T06:50:54Z
dc.date.available2020-10-12T06:50:54Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.issn0314-8769en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/398287
dc.description.abstractHouses are quintessential statements of identity, encoding elements of personal and social attitudes, aspirations and realities. As functional containers for human life, they reflect the exigencies of their construction and occupation, as well as the alterations that ensued as contexts, occupants and uses changed. As older houses endure into subsequent social contexts, they become drawn into later symbolic landscapes, connoting both past and present social relationships simultaneously and connecting the two via the many ways they are understood and represented in the present. As historical archaeologist Anne Yentsch has argued: ‘Many cultural values, including ideas about power relationships and social inequality, are expressed within the context of the stories surrounding houses’.1 This paper is one attempt to investigate the stories surrounding a ruined pastoral homestead in central northern Queensland in light of relationships between non-Aboriginal and Aboriginal people on the frontier.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherANU Pressen_US
dc.publisher.urihttps://www.jstor.org/stable/90018871en_US
dc.publisher.urihttps://openresearch-repository.anu.edu.au/handle/1885/209102
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom151en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto176en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalAboriginal Historyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume41en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchLiterary Studiesen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchOther Language, Communication and Cultureen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchHistorical Studiesen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode2005en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode2099en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode2103en_US
dc.subject.keywordsArts & Humanitiesen_US
dc.subject.keywordsHistoryen_US
dc.subject.keywordsFRONTIERen_US
dc.titleThe homestead as fortress: Fact or folklore?en_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articlesen_US
dcterms.bibliographicCitationBurke, H; Wallis, LA; Barker, B; Tutty, M; Cole, N; Davidson, I; Hatte, E; Lowe, K, The homestead as fortress: Fact or folklore?, Aboriginal History, 2017, 41, pp. 151-176en_US
dc.date.updated2020-10-12T06:16:44Z
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)en_US
gro.rights.copyright© 2017 ANU Press. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.en_US
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorWallis, Lynley A.


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record