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dc.contributor.authorBaird, Kathleen
dc.contributor.authorCreedy, Debra K
dc.contributor.authorBrandjerdporn, Grace
dc.contributor.authorGillespie, Kerri
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-21T01:26:37Z
dc.date.available2020-10-21T01:26:37Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.issn1871-5192
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.wombi.2020.09.023
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/398485
dc.description.abstractBackground: Domestic and family violence (DFV) is known to escalate during pregnancy. Routine screening for DFV in maternity departments is a widely acceptable practice according to staff and women. This study is part of a 3-year follow-up of an organisational intervention evaluation and aimed to identify clinicians’ perceptions of current practices, as well as barriers and enablers to DFV antenatal screening. Method: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with ten midwives about conducting DFV screening within the maternity department of a large tertiary public hospital in Queensland, Australia. Interview transcripts were read and thematically analysed by two independent researchers. Results: Four main themes emerged from the data: uncertainty despite education and training; fear of opening Pandora’s Box; working with ‘red flags’ and ‘gut feelings’; and it’s all about the relationship. Conclusion: Although clinicians identified the importance of guidelines for managing DFV and knowledge of resources and services, confidence varied. Ongoing, formal, mandatory training in the area of DFV was highlighted. Managing partner presence in the room, building rapport with the woman, and time constraints continue to be challenging barriers to DFV detection. Routine screening, continuity of care, and staff knowledge and experience were major enablers to successful detection and response.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.publisher.placeAustralia
dc.relation.ispartofjournalWomen and Birth
dc.subject.fieldofresearchNursing
dc.subject.fieldofresearchSociology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical and Health Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1110
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1608
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode11
dc.titleRed flags and gut feelings—Midwives’ perceptions of domestic and family violence screening and detection in a maternity department
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationBaird, K; Creedy, DK; Brandjerdporn, G; Gillespie, K, Red flags and gut feelings—Midwives’ perceptions of domestic and family violence screening and detection in a maternity department, Women and Birth, 2020
dcterms.licensehttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.date.updated2020-10-19T21:36:03Z
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript (AM)
gro.description.notepublicThis publication has been entered in Griffith Research Online as an advanced online version.
gro.rights.copyright© 2020 Elsevier. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International Licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/) which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, providing that the work is properly cited.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorBaird, Kathleen M.
gro.griffith.authorCreedy, Debra K.
gro.griffith.authorGillespie, Kerri M.


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