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dc.contributor.authorSchouten, Peteren_US
dc.contributor.authorParisi, A.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T15:40:55Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T15:40:55Z
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.date.modified2011-09-23T07:05:27Z
dc.identifier.issn1011-1344en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jphotobiol.2010.11.001en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/39864
dc.description.abstractSeveral broadband ultraviolet (UV) radiation angular distribution investigations have been previously presented. As the biologically damaging effectiveness of UV radiation is known to be wavelength dependent, it is necessary to expand this research into the distribution of the spectral UV. UV radiation is also susceptible to Rayleigh and Mie scattering processes, both of which are completely wavelength dependent. Additionally, the majority of previous measurements detailing the biologically damaging effect of spectral UV radiation have been oriented with respect to the horizontal plane or in a plane directed towards the sun (sun-normal), with the irradiance weighted against action spectra formulated specifically for human skin and tissue. However, the human body consists of very few horizontal or sun-normal surfaces. Extending the previous research by measuring the distribution of the spectral irradiance across the sky for the complete terrestrial solar UV waveband and weighting it against erythemal, photoconjunctivital and photokeratital action spectra allowed for the analysis of the differences between the biologically effective irradiance (UVBE) values intercepted at different orientations and the effect of scattering processes upon the homogeneity of these UVBE distributions. It was established that under the local atmospheric environment, the distribution profile of the UVBE for each biological response was anisotropic, with the highest intensities generally intercepted at inclination angles situated between the horizontal and vertical planes along orientations closely coinciding with the sun-normal. A finding from this was that the angular distributions of the erythemal UVBE and the photoconjunctivital UVBE were different, due to the differential scattering between the shorter and longer UV wavelengths within the atmosphere.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent941774 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherElsevier BVen_US
dc.publisher.placeSwitzerlanden_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom146en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto155en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue2en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Photochemistry and Photobiology B: Biologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume102en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPhysical Sciences not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode029999en_US
dc.titleDirect comparison between the angular distributions of the erythemal and eye-damaging UV irradiances: A pilot studyen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, Griffith School of Engineeringen_US
gro.rights.copyright© 2010 Elsevier B.V. This is the author-manuscript version of this paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.en_US
gro.date.issued2011
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorSchouten, Peter W.


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