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dc.contributor.authorBikundo, Edwin
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-03T08:58:58Z
dc.date.available2020-11-03T08:58:58Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.issn1535-685Xen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/1535685X.2020.1830502en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/398934
dc.description.abstractMetaphorical references to the devil in international criminal justice are various, varied and tap into a rich vein of allusion, association and meaning. These range from simple references to evil to more complex referencing to Faustian pacts of one form or the other, to the downright esoteric encompassing the arcane origins of the immunity erstwhile afforded to official acts. Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta’s statement ‘That devil shall be defeated’ as well as Canadian General Romeo Dallaire’s ‘Shake Hands with the Devil’ are two examples respectively resisting and promoting international individual criminal liability. That Carl Schmitt was asked by his interrogator at Nuremberg ‘when did you renounce the devil?’ and that defence counsel at the International Criminal court in the Kenyan Situation analogised the Kenyan government as being accused of entering into ‘a deal with the devil’, to the judge at Rudolf Kastner’s case in Israel related to Nazi- era crimes described him as having ‘sold his soul to the devil’; cut across perpetrators and victims and speak of knowing and willing compacts with evil in order to, allegedly, produce good. Which is to say that are all political theodicies explaining away evil by linking it in some causal way to good.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis (Routledge)en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalLaw & Literatureen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchLawen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchLiterary Studiesen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCriminologyen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1801en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode2005en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1602en_US
dc.titleReading Faust into International Criminal Lawen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articlesen_US
dcterms.bibliographicCitationBikundo, E, Reading Faust into International Criminal Law, Law & Literature , 2020en_US
dc.date.updated2020-10-01T20:55:02Z
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript (AM)en_US
gro.description.notepublicThis publication has been entered in Griffith Research Online as an advanced online version.en_US
gro.rights.copyrightThis is an Author's Accepted Manuscript of an article published in Law & Literature, 27 Oct 2020, copyright Taylor & Francis, available online at: https://doi.org/10.1080/1535685X.2020.1830502en_US
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorBikundo, Edwin


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