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dc.contributor.authorSmith, Sally de-Vitry
dc.contributor.authorDietsch, Elaine
dc.contributor.authorBonner, Ann
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-09T03:35:11Z
dc.date.available2020-12-09T03:35:11Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.issn1871-5192
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.wombi.2012.05.003
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/400126
dc.description.abstractBackground: Pregnant women find themselves subject to comments and questions from people in public areas. Normally, becoming 'public property' is considered friendly and is relatively easy for pregnant women to deal with. However, following diagnosis of a foetal anomaly, the experience of being public property can exacerbate the emotional turmoil experienced by couples. Original research question: What is the experience of couples who continue pregnancy following the diagnosis of a foetal anomaly? Method: The study used an interpretive design informed by Merleau-Ponty and this paper reports on a subset of findings. Thirty-one interviews with pregnant women and their partners were undertaken following the diagnosis of a serious or lethal foetal anomaly. Women were between 25 and 38 weeks gestation at the time of their first interview. The non-directive interviews were audio-taped, transcribed verbatim and the transcripts were thematically analysed. Findings: A prominent theme that emerged during data analysis was that pregnancy is embodied therefore physically evident and 'public'. Women found it difficult to deal with being public property when the foetus had a serious or lethal anomaly. Some women avoided social situations; others did not disclose the foetal condition but gave minimal or avoidant answers to minimise distress to themselves and others. The male participants were not visibly pregnant and they could continue life in public without being subject to the public's gaze, but they were very aware and concerned about its impact on their partner. Conclusion: The public tend to assume that pregnancy is normal and will produce a healthy baby. This becomes problematic for women who have a foetus with an anomaly. Women use strategies to help them cope with becoming public property during pregnancy. Midwives can play an important role in reducing the negative consequences of a woman becoming public property following the diagnosis of a foetal anomaly.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom76
dc.relation.ispartofpageto81
dc.relation.ispartofissue1
dc.relation.ispartofjournalWomen and Birth
dc.relation.ispartofvolume26
dc.subject.fieldofresearchBiomedical and clinical sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode32
dc.subject.keywordsScience & Technology
dc.subject.keywordsLife Sciences & Biomedicine
dc.subject.keywordsNursing
dc.subject.keywordsObstetrics & Gynecology
dc.subject.keywordsPublic property
dc.titlePregnancy as public property: The experience of couples following diagnosis of a foetal anomaly
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationSmith, SD-V; Dietsch, E; Bonner, A, Pregnancy as public property: The experience of couples following diagnosis of a foetal anomaly, Women and Birth, 2013, 26 (1), pp. 76-81
dcterms.dateAccepted2012-05-26
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.date.updated2020-12-09T03:32:29Z
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript (AM)
gro.rights.copyright© 2013 Elsevier. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International Licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/) which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, providing that the work is properly cited.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorBonner, Ann J.


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