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dc.contributor.authorLievens, Eline
dc.contributor.authorBellinger, Phillip
dc.contributor.authorVan Vossel, Kim
dc.contributor.authorVancompernolle, Jan
dc.contributor.authorBex, Tine
dc.contributor.authorMinahan, Clare
dc.contributor.authorDerave, Wim
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-10T04:25:33Z
dc.date.available2020-12-10T04:25:33Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.issn0195-9131
dc.identifier.doi10.1249/mss.0000000000002518
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/400153
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Classical track-and-field studies demonstrated that elite endurance athletes exhibit a slow muscle typology, while elite sprint athletes have a predominant fast muscle typology. In elite cycling, conclusive data on muscle typology are scarce, which may be due to the invasive nature of muscle biopsies. The non-invasive estimation of muscle typology through the measurement of muscle carnosine enabled to explore the muscle typology of 80 world-class cyclists of different disciplines. Methods: The muscle carnosine content of 80 cyclists (4 bicycle motor cross racing (BMX), 33 track, 8 cyclo-cross, 24 road and 11 mountain bike) was measured in the soleus and gastrocnemius by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and expressed as a z-score relative to a reference population. Track cyclists were divided into track sprint and endurance cyclists based on their UCI-ranking. Moreover, road cyclists were further characterized based on the percentage of UCI points earned during either single- and multi-stage races. Results: BMX cyclists (carnosine aggregate z-score of 1.33) are characterized by a faster muscle typology than track, cyclo-cross, road and mountain bike cyclists (carnosine aggregate z-score of –0.08, -0.76, -0.96 and –1.02, respectively: P<0.05). Track cyclists also possess a faster muscle typology compared to mountain bikers (P=0.033) and road cyclists (P=0.005). Moreover, track sprinters show a significant faster muscle typology (carnosine aggregate z-score of 0.87) compared to track endurance cyclists (carnosine aggregate z-score of -0.44) (P<0.001). In road cyclists, the higher the carnosine aggregate z-score, the higher the percentage of UCI points gained during single-stage races (r=0.517, P=0.010). Conclusions: Prominent differences in the non-invasively determined muscle typology exist between elite cyclists of various disciplines, which opens opportunities for application in talent orientation and transfer.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherOvid Technologies (Wolters Kluwer Health)
dc.relation.ispartofjournalMedicine & Science in Sports & Exercise
dc.subject.fieldofresearchHuman Movement and Sports Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical Physiology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic Health and Health Services
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1106
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1116
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1117
dc.titleMuscle Typology of World-Class Cyclists across Various Disciplines and Events
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationLievens, E; Bellinger, P; Van Vossel, K; Vancompernolle, J; Bex, T; Minahan, C; Derave, W, Muscle Typology of World-Class Cyclists across Various Disciplines and Events, Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 2020
dc.date.updated2020-12-09T23:30:28Z
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript (AM)
gro.rights.copyright© 2020LWW. This is a non-final version of an article published in final form in Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, Published Ahead of Print. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal link for access to the definitive, published version.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorBellinger, Phil M.
gro.griffith.authorMinahan, Clare L.


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