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dc.contributor.authorAnderson, JK
dc.contributor.authorBonner, A
dc.contributor.authorGrootjans, J
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-15T06:55:52Z
dc.date.available2020-12-15T06:55:52Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.issn1445-6354
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/400248
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: The Multi-purpose Service (MPS) Program was introduced to rural Australia in 1991 as a solution to poor health outcomes in rural compared with metropolitan populations, difficulty in attracting healthcare staff and a lack of viability and range of ealth services in rural areas. The aim of this study was to describe the main concerns of participants involved in the development of multi-purpose services in rural New South Wales (NSW). This article is abstracted from a larger study and discusses the extent to which collaboration occurred within the new multi-purpose service. Methods: A constructivist grounded theory methodology was used. Participants were from 13 multi-purpose services in rural NSW and 30 in-depth interviews were conducted with 6 community members, 11 managers and 13 staff members who had been involved in the process of developing a multi-purpose service. Results: The main concern of all participants was their anticipation of risk. This anticipation of risk manifested itself in either trust or suspicion and explained their progression through a phase of collaborating. Participants who had trust in other stakeholders were more likely to embrace an integrated health service identity. Those participants, who were suspicious that they would lose status or power, maintained that the previous hospital services provided a better health service and described a coexistence of services within the multi-purpose service. Conclusions: This study provided an insight into the perceptions of community members, staff members and managers involved in the process of developing a multi-purpose service. It revealed that the anticipation of risk was intrinsic to a process of changing from a traditional hospital service to collaborating in a new model of health care provided at a multi-purpose service.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherAustralian Rural Health Education Network
dc.publisher.urihttps://www.rrh.org.au/journal/article/1827
dc.relation.ispartofissue4
dc.relation.ispartofjournalRural and Remote Health
dc.relation.ispartofvolume11
dc.subject.fieldofresearchNursing
dc.subject.fieldofresearchSpecialist studies in education
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode4205
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode3904
dc.subject.keywordsScience & Technology
dc.subject.keywordsLife Sciences & Biomedicine
dc.subject.keywordsPublic, Environmental & Occupational Health
dc.subject.keywordsAustralia
dc.subject.keywordscollaboration
dc.titleCollaboration: developing integration in multi-purpose services in rural New South Wales, Australia
dc.typeJournal article
dcterms.bibliographicCitationAnderson, JK; Bonner, A; Grootjans, J, Collaboration: developing integration in multi-purpose services in rural New South Wales, Australia, Rural and Remote Health, 2011, 11 (4)
dc.date.updated2020-12-15T06:52:56Z
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)
gro.rights.copyright© JK Anderson, A Bonner, J Grootjans, 2011. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorBonner, Ann J.


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