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dc.contributor.authorZhao, Q
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Y
dc.contributor.authorGuo, F
dc.contributor.authorLeigh, C
dc.contributor.authorJia, X
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-17T04:46:42Z
dc.date.available2020-12-17T04:46:42Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.issn0045-6535en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.chemosphere.2020.127994en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/400336
dc.description.abstractAnthropogenic salinisation is becoming an increasing global issue for freshwater ecosystems, leading to serious biodiversity loss and ecosystem degradation. While the effect of anthropogenic salinisation on freshwater ecosystems has been intensively studied in recent years, most studies focus on salinisation effects on the individual or single groups of organisms without considering the effect on the ecosystem levels, such as diversity and trophic links. Therefore, we conducted a long-term field survey from May 2009 to August 2016 at 405 sites in northeast China to investigate the effect of a gradient of salinisation on community diversity, functional diversity and trophic links in mountain streams. Samples of water chemistry, periphyton, macroinvertebrates and fish were collected. Our results showed that as anthropogenic salinisation increased, Ca2+, Mg2+, HCO3− and SO42− exhibited significant increases (p < 0.05). These increased ions caused decreases in taxonomic evenness and biotic integrity, but an increase in the beta diversity for periphyton and macroinvertebrates, and a slight increase in the evenness of fish. The increased salinisation resulted in the extirpation of salt-sensitive taxa and declines in macroinvertebrate functional richness and functional redundancy, which consequently led to simplified trophic links. Our results implied that if salt-tolerant taxa in high salinisation sites were not functionally redundant with less tolerant taxa, alterations of their functional composition probably decrease the stability of ecosystem functions. Overall, our study suggests that the ongoing anthropogenic salinisation is posing serious threats to biodiversity and trophic links in river ecosystems, and should be considered in future river restoration and biodiversity conservation.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom127994en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalChemosphereen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume263en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchFreshwater Ecologyen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode060204en_US
dc.subject.keywordsBiodiversityen_US
dc.subject.keywordsEcosystem functionen_US
dc.subject.keywordsFishen_US
dc.subject.keywordsFunctional diversityen_US
dc.subject.keywordsWater chemistryen_US
dc.titleIncreasing anthropogenic salinisation leads to declines in community diversity, functional diversity and trophic links in mountain streamsen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articlesen_US
dcterms.bibliographicCitationZhao, Q; Zhang, Y; Guo, F; Leigh, C; Jia, X, Increasing anthropogenic salinisation leads to declines in community diversity, functional diversity and trophic links in mountain streams, Chemosphere, 2021, 263, pp. 127994en_US
dcterms.dateAccepted2020-08-10
dc.date.updated2020-12-17T04:32:34Z
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorLeigh, Catherine


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