Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorOkafor, Charles Ebuka
dc.date.accessioned2021-01-10T22:52:44Z
dc.date.available2021-01-10T22:52:44Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.issn2509-4262
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s41669-020-00251-6
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/400829
dc.description.abstractBackground As Nigeria prepares to introduce a rotavirus vaccine, the Gavi board has approved the extension of the transition period for the country until 2028. The current position of the country on Gavi’s funding profile calls for a pragmatic step in planning and implementation so that sustainability at the fully self-financing phase will be feasible. Objective This study aimed to inform the decisions of the country’s health policymakers on the costs, benefits, and implications of the introduction of rotavirus vaccine. Methods This study was an economic evaluation using a simulation-based Markov model. It compared four approaches: ‘no vaccination’ and vaccination with ROTARIX, ROTAVAC, or ROTASIIL. Ten cohorts from the year 2021 to 2030 were used in the analysis. Primary measures were the benefit-cost ratio (BCR) and the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER). Future costs and outcomes were discounted to 2019 values. Results The adjusted vaccine cost of ROTARIX was the highest, followed by ROTAVAC and ROTASIIL, whereas the immunization delivery cost was in the reverse order. All the vaccines were very cost effective, with ROTARIX being the optimal choice for the 10-year period, having a BCR of 27 and an ICER of $US100 (95% confidence interval [CI] 71–130)/disability-adjusted life-year averted. Adopting ROTARIX was the optimal choice from 2021 to 2027, whereas ROTAVAC was optimal from 2028 to 2030. The net budget impact of the programme was $US76.9 million for the 10-year period. The opportunity cost of a late introduction was about $US8 million per annum from 2021 to 2028. Conclusions The rotavirus vaccine ROTARIX should be implemented in Nigeria at the earliest opportunity. A switch to ROTAVAC should be considered from the year 2028. Cost-minimization measures are imperative to ensure the sustainability of the programme after the transition out of Gavi support.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherSpringer Science and Business Media LLC
dc.relation.ispartofjournalPharmacoEconomics - Open
dc.subject.fieldofresearchHealth Economics
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic Health and Health Services
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode140208
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1117
dc.titleIntroducing Rotavirus Vaccination in Nigeria: Economic Evaluation and Implications
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationOkafor, CE, Introducing Rotavirus Vaccination in Nigeria: Economic Evaluation and Implications, PharmacoEconomics - Open
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.date.updated2021-01-09T07:22:18Z
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)
gro.description.notepublicThis publication has been entered as an advanced online version in Griffith Research Online.
gro.rights.copyright© The Author(s) 2021. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License, which permits any non-commercial use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorOkafor, Charles E.


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record