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dc.contributor.authorThorn, Simon
dc.contributor.authorSeibold, Sebastian
dc.contributor.authorLeverkus, Alexandro B
dc.contributor.authorMichler, Thomas
dc.contributor.authorMueller, Jorg
dc.contributor.authorNoss, Reed F
dc.contributor.authorStork, Nigel
dc.contributor.authorVogel, Sebastian
dc.contributor.authorLindenmayer, David B
dc.date.accessioned2021-01-12T03:21:01Z
dc.date.available2021-01-12T03:21:01Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.issn1540-9295
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/fee.2252
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/400912
dc.description.abstractGlobal sustainability agendas focus primarily on halting deforestation, yet the biodiversity crisis resulting from the degradation of remaining forests is going largely unnoticed. Forest degradation occurs through the loss of key ecological structures, such as dying trees and deadwood, even in the absence of deforestation. One of the main drivers of forest degradation is limited awareness by policy makers and the public on the importance of these structures for supporting forest biodiversity and ecosystem function. Here, we outline management strategies to protect forest health and biodiversity by maintaining and promoting deadwood, and propose environmental education initiatives to improve the general awareness of the importance of deadwood. Finally, we call for major reforms to forest management to maintain and restore deadwood; large, old trees; and other key ecological structures.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherWiley
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom505
dc.relation.ispartofpageto512
dc.relation.ispartofissue9
dc.relation.ispartofjournalFrontiers in Ecology and the Environment
dc.relation.ispartofvolume18
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEcology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode0602
dc.subject.keywordsScience & Technology
dc.subject.keywordsLife Sciences & Biomedicine
dc.subject.keywordsEnvironmental Sciences
dc.titleThe living dead: acknowledging life after tree death to stop forest degradation
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationThorn, S; Seibold, S; Leverkus, AB; Michler, T; Mueller, J; Noss, RF; Stork, N; Vogel, S; Lindenmayer, DB, The living dead: acknowledging life after tree death to stop forest degradation, Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, 2020, 18 (9), pp. 505-512
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.date.updated2021-01-12T03:18:07Z
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)
gro.rights.copyright© 2020 The Authors. Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment published by Wiley Periodicals LLC on behalf of the Ecological Society of America. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorLindenmayer, David
gro.griffith.authorStork, Nigel E.


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