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dc.contributor.authorRose, Terry J
dc.contributor.authorKearney, Lee J
dc.contributor.authorVan Zwieten, Lukas
dc.contributor.authorRose, Michael T
dc.date.accessioned2021-01-13T22:41:01Z
dc.date.available2021-01-13T22:41:01Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.issn2571-8789en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/soilsystems4040075en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/401010
dc.description.abstractNitrous oxide (N2O) is a potent greenhouse gas, and drained tropical/subtropical wetland soils that are high in carbon (C) make a substantial contribution to global anthropogenic N2O emissions. However, we previously reported negligible N2O emissions from an acidic, C-rich Gleysol under aerobic rice (Oryza sativa L.) production in the subtropics despite ample moisture and fertiliser nitrogen (N). In a field experiment, seasonal cumulative N2O emissions in the field following the application of 90 kg ha−1 N as urea were low (0.15 kg N2O-N ha−1·season−1). An incubation study examining the effects of temperature (20 °C, 25 °C and 30 °C) and water-filled pore space (WFPS; 40% vs. 60%) on N transformations showed that incubation temperature had a larger influence on nitrification than WFPS (40% vs. 60%). There was limited nitrification at 20 °C at either WFPS over 30 days, but low concentrations of NO3− (<100 mg kg−1) began to accumulate between 16–23 days at 30 °C and between 23–30 days at 25 °C. Liming soil resulted in nitrification after 10 days, while only minor nitrification was evident in the unlimed soil. The presence of the nitrification inhibitor 3,4-dimethylpyrazole phosphate (DMPP) with urea delayed nitrification for up to 4 days in the limed soil, suggesting such inhibitors may not provide substantial benefits in high C soils. Our results suggest that a low soil pH contributes to impaired nitrification in the C-rich Gleysol examined, which is associated with low fluxes of N2O in the field. We suggest that soil pH could potentially be manipulated to sustain low rates of nitrification and lower N losses, without compromising crop growth.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherMDPIen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom75en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue4en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalSoil Systemsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume4en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchSoil Sciencesen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode0503en_US
dc.subject.keywordsScience & Technologyen_US
dc.subject.keywordsLife Sciences & Biomedicineen_US
dc.subject.keywordsAgricultureen_US
dc.subject.keywordsgreenhouse gas emissionsen_US
dc.titleLow pH of a High Carbon Gleysol Contributes to Nitrification Inhibition Resulting in Low N2O Soil Emissions and Limited Effectiveness of Nitrification Inhibitorsen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articlesen_US
dcterms.bibliographicCitationRose, TJ; Kearney, LJ; Van Zwieten, L; Rose, MT, Low pH of a High Carbon Gleysol Contributes to Nitrification Inhibition Resulting in Low N2O Soil Emissions and Limited Effectiveness of Nitrification Inhibitors, Soil Systems, 2020, 4 (4)en_US
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en_US
dc.date.updated2021-01-13T22:34:33Z
dc.description.versionPublisheden_US
gro.rights.copyright© 2020 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.en_US
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorVan Zwieten, Lukas


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