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dc.contributor.authorDe Coensel, B
dc.contributor.authorCan, A
dc.contributor.authorDegraeuwe, B
dc.contributor.authorDe Vlieger, I
dc.contributor.authorBotteldooren, D
dc.date.accessioned2021-01-17T22:40:23Z
dc.date.available2021-01-17T22:40:23Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.issn1364-8152en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.envsoft.2012.02.009en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/401171
dc.description.abstractTraffic management solutions are increasingly called for to address problems of transport and mobility. In particular, coordinated traffic lights that create green waves along major arterials are an increasingly used strategy to reduce travel times. Although it is usually assumed that an improved traffic flow will result in lower vehicle emissions, little scientific research has been spent on the effects of synchronized traffic lights on emissions. Moreover, because changes in traffic flow do not necessarily influence travel times, noise and air quality in the same way, there is a clear need for a combined approach. This paper reports on a computational study in which a microscopic traffic simulation model (Paramics) is combined with submodels for the emission of noise (Imagine) and air pollutants (VERSIT+). Through the simulation of a range of scenarios, the model is used to investigate the influence of traffic intensity, signal coordination schemes and signal parameters on the noise, carbon dioxide, nitrogen oxides and particulate matter emissions along an arterial road equiped with a series of traffic lights. It was found that the introduction of a green wave could potentially lower the emissions of the considered air pollutants by 10%-40% in the most favorable conditions, depending on traffic flow and signal timing settings. Sound pressure levels were found to decrease by up to 1 dB(A) near the traffic signals, but to increase by up to 1.5 dB(A) in between intersections. Traffic intensity and green split were found to have the largest influence on emissions, while the cycle time did not have a significant influence on emissions.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom74en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto83en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalEnvironmental Modelling & Softwareen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume35en_US
dc.subject.keywordsScience & Technologyen_US
dc.subject.keywordsLife Sciences & Biomedicineen_US
dc.subject.keywordsComputer Science, Interdisciplinary Applicationsen_US
dc.subject.keywordsEngineering, Environmentalen_US
dc.titleEffects of traffic signal coordination on noise and air pollutant emissionsen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articlesen_US
dcterms.bibliographicCitationDe Coensel, B; Can, A; Degraeuwe, B; De Vlieger, I; Botteldooren, D, Effects of traffic signal coordination on noise and air pollutant emissions, Environmental Modelling & Software, 2012, 35, pp. 74-83en_US
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en_US
dc.date.updated2021-01-17T22:38:03Z
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript (AM)en_US
gro.rights.copyright© 2012 Elsevier. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International Licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/) which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, providing that the work is properly cited.en_US
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorDe Coensel, Bert


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