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dc.contributor.authorSchaller-Schwaner, I
dc.contributor.authorKirkpatrick, A
dc.date.accessioned2021-01-19T01:11:19Z
dc.date.available2021-01-19T01:11:19Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.isbn9781108482530
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/9781108685153.012
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/401173
dc.description.abstractThe origin of the term ‘lingua franca’ is unclear. According to Ostler (2010, p. 7), lingua franca “seems to be a retranslation of some Eastern-Mediterranean term for ‘language of the Franks’”. Ostler also notes (2010, p. 4) the “original ‘Lingua Franca’ was once a particular language … the common contact language of the Eastern-Mediterranean in the first half of the second millennium, the pidgin Italian in which Greeks and Turks could talk to Frenchmen and Italians”. He defines a lingua franca as a “contact language used for communication among people who do not share a mother tongue” (2010, p. 36). Seidlhofer points out that the term has Latin roots meaning something like ‘free language’. “It is thus not fanciful to think of ‘Lingua Franca’ as ‘free language’ … a means of intercultural communication not particular to countries and ethnicities, a linguistic resource that is not contained in, or constrained by traditional (and notoriously tendentious) ideas of what constitutes a ‘language’” (2011, p. 81).
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.publisherCambridge University Press
dc.relation.ispartofbooktitleOntologies of English: Conceptualising the Language for Learning, Teaching, and Assessment
dc.relation.ispartofchapter12
dc.relation.ispartofchapternumbers13
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom233
dc.relation.ispartofpageto252
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCambridge Applied Linguistics
dc.relation.urihttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/ARC/DP130103079
dc.relation.grantIDDP130103079
dc.relation.fundersARC
dc.subject.fieldofresearchLinguistics
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode2004
dc.subject.keywordsEnglish as a Lingua Franca
dc.subject.keywordsMultilingual Practice
dc.subject.keywordsInstitutional Bilingualism
dc.titleWhat is English in the light of Lingua Franca usage?
dc.typeBook chapter
dc.type.descriptionB1 - Chapters
dcterms.bibliographicCitationSchaller-Schwaner, I; Kirkpatrick, A, What is English in the light of Lingua Franca usage?, Ontologies of English: Conceptualising the Language for Learning, Teaching, and Assessment, 2019, pp. 233-252
dc.date.updated2021-01-15T09:54:01Z
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript (AM)
gro.rights.copyright© 2019 Cambridge University Press. This material has been published in Ontologies of English: Conceptualising the Language for Learning, Teaching, and Assessment edited by C.J. Hall & R. Wicaksono, 10.1017/9781108685153.012. This version is free to view and download for private research and study only. Not for re-distribution or re-use.
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gro.griffith.authorKirkpatrick, Andy A.


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