Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorPasut, Chiara
dc.contributor.authorTang, Fiona HM
dc.contributor.authorHamilton, David P
dc.contributor.authorMaggi, Federico
dc.date.accessioned2021-01-20T23:25:08Z
dc.date.available2021-01-20T23:25:08Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.issn2073-4433
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/atmos12010042
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/401362
dc.description.abstractAustralian ecosystems, particularly wetlands, are facing new and extreme threats due to climate change, land use, and other human interventions. However, more fundamental knowledge is required to understand how nutrient turnover in wetlands is affected. In this study, we deployed a mechanistic biogeochemical model of carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and sulfur (S) cycles at 0.25∘× 0.25∘ spatial resolution across wetlands in Australia. Our modeling was used to assess nutrient inputs to soil, elemental nutrient fluxes across the soil organic and mineral pools, and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in different climatic areas. In the decade 2008–2017, we estimated an average annual emission of 5.12 Tg-CH4, 90.89 Tg-CO2, and 2.34 × 10−2 Tg-N2O. Temperate wetlands in Australia have three times more N2O emissions than tropical wetlands as a result of fertilization, despite similar total area extension. Tasmania wetlands have the highest areal GHG emission rates. C fluxes in soil depend strongly on hydroclimatic factors; they are mainly controlled by anaerobic respiration in temperate and tropical regions and by aerobic respiration in arid regions. In contrast, N and S fluxes are mostly governed by plant uptake regardless of the region and season. The new knowledge from this study may help design conservation and adaptation plans to climate change and better protect the Australian wetland ecosystem.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherMDPI AG
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom42
dc.relation.ispartofissue1
dc.relation.ispartofjournalAtmosphere
dc.relation.ispartofvolume12
dc.subject.fieldofresearchAtmospheric Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEnvironmental Science and Management
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode0401
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode0502
dc.titleCarbon, Nitrogen, and Sulfur Elemental Fluxes in the Soil and Exchanges with the Atmosphere in Australian Tropical, Temperate, and Arid Wetlands
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationPasut, C; Tang, FHM; Hamilton, DP; Maggi, F, Carbon, Nitrogen, and Sulfur Elemental Fluxes in the Soil and Exchanges with the Atmosphere in Australian Tropical, Temperate, and Arid Wetlands, Atmosphere, 12 (1), pp. 42
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.date.updated2021-01-20T22:20:49Z
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)
gro.rights.copyright© 2021 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorHamilton, David P.


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record