Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorBrown, A Jen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T15:58:17Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T15:58:17Z
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.date.modified2011-08-19T06:44:36Z
dc.identifier.issn1038-3441en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/40142
dc.description.abstractIt all began with a public-interest whistleblower. Yet within a few years of the Fitzgerald Inquiry, Queensland legislative efforts to encourage and protect whistleblowing - while historic in some respects - had fallen short of the types of measures identified as realistically needed to prevent the case for such an inquiry from arising again. This article examines the role of ?whistleblowing' or ?public-interest disclosure' legislation in modern integrity systems, and the priorities for law reform in Queensland, in light of 20 years of post-Fitzgerald experience as well as recent, comprehensive empirical research into the management of whistleblowing in the Australian public sector. While much has been achieved, this experience demonstrates the need to return to first principles in strengthening whistleblowing arrangements, on basic issues such as mechanisms for ensuring organisational justice for public officers who speak up about wrongdoing, and in recognising the role of the media as a whistleblowing avenue of last resort. The article also charts imperatives for further research and legislative reform to ensure best practice in the protection of whistleblowers in the non-government sectors, as well as non-whistleblower complainants and informants, if Queensland and Australian integrity systems are to return to a position of international leadership.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent438403 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherGriffith University Law Schoolen_US
dc.publisher.placeAustraliaen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.griffith.edu.au/law/griffith-law-reviewen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom666en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto691en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue3en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalGriffith Law Reviewen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume18en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchConstitutional Lawen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode180108en_US
dc.titleRestoring the Sunshine to the Sunshine State: Priorities for Whistleblowing Law Reform in Queenslanden_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2009 Griffith Law School. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.en_AU
gro.date.issued2009
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record