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dc.contributor.authorDesbrow, Benen_US
dc.contributor.authorEllis, Aleshiaen_US
dc.contributor.authorGrant, Garyen_US
dc.contributor.authorLeveritt, Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.authorO'Keeffe, Brookeen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-04T18:45:41Z
dc.date.available2017-04-04T18:45:41Z
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.date.modified2011-08-19T06:45:38Z
dc.identifier.issn0264-0414en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/02640414.2010.541480en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/40164
dc.description.abstractIn this study, we investigated the impact of a controlled 4-day caffeine withdrawal period on the effect of an acute caffeine dose on endurance exercise performance. Twelve well-trained and familiarized male cyclists, who were caffeine consumers (from coffee and a range of other sources), were recruited for the study. A double-blind placebo-controlled cross-over design was employed, involving four experimental trials. Participants abstained from dietary caffeine sources for 4 days before the trials and ingested caspulses (one in the morning and one in the afternoon) containing either placebo or caffeine (1.5 mg 砫g-1 body weight 砤ay-1). On day 5, capsules containing placebo or caffeine (3 mg 砫g-1 body weight) were ingested 90 min before completing a time trial, equivalent to one hour of cycling at 75% peak sustainable power output. Hence the study was designed to incorporate placebo-placebo, placebo-caffeine, caffeine-placebo, and caffeine-caffeine conditions. Performance time was significantly improved after acute caffeine ingestion by 1:49 ᠱ:41 min (3.0%, P = 0.021) following a withdrawal period (placebo-placebo vs. placebo-caffeine), and by 2:07 ᠱ:28 min (3.6%, P = 0.002) following the non-withdrawal period (caffeine-placebo vs. caffeine-caffeine). No significant difference was detetcted between the two acute caffeine trials (placebo-caffeine vs. caffeine-caffeine). Average heart rate throughout exercise was significantly higher following acute caffeine administration compared with placebo. No differences were observed in ratings of perceived exertion between trials. A 3 mg 砫g-1 dose of caffeine significantly improves exercise performance irrespective of whether a 4-day withdrawal period is imposed on habitual caffeine users.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherRoutledgeen_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationYen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom509en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto515en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue5en_AU
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Sports Sciencesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume29en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical and Sports Nutritionen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode111101en_US
dc.titleCaffeine withdrawal and high-intensity endurance cycling performanceen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Public Healthen_US
gro.date.issued2011
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


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