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dc.contributor.authorGopinath, D
dc.contributor.authorMenon, RK
dc.contributor.authorWie, CC
dc.contributor.authorBanerjee, M
dc.contributor.authorPanda, S
dc.contributor.authorMandal, D
dc.contributor.authorBehera, PK
dc.contributor.authorRoychoudhury, S
dc.contributor.authorKheur, S
dc.contributor.authorBotelho, MG
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, NW
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-07T23:32:58Z
dc.date.available2021-02-07T23:32:58Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.issn2045-2322en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s41598-020-80859-0en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/401779
dc.description.abstractMicrobial dysbiosis has been implicated in the pathogenesis of oral cancer. We analyzed the compositional and metabolic profile of the bacteriome in three specific niches in oral cancer patients along with controls using 16SrRNA sequencing (Illumina Miseq) and DADA2 software. We found major differences between patients and control subjects. Bacterial communities associated with the tumor surface and deep paired tumor tissue differed significantly. Tumor surfaces carried elevated abundances of taxa belonging to genera Porphyromonas, Enterobacteriae, Neisseria, Streptococcus and Fusobacteria, whereas Prevotella, Treponema, Sphingomonas, Meiothermus and Mycoplasma genera were significantly more abundant in deep tissue. The most abundant microbial metabolic pathways were those related to fatty-acid biosynthesis, carbon metabolism and amino-acid metabolism on the tumor surface: carbohydrate metabolism and organic polymer degradation were elevated in tumor tissues. The bacteriome of saliva from patients with oral cancer differed significantly from paired tumor tissue in terms of community structure, however remained similar at taxonomic and metabolic levels except for elevated abundances of Streptococcus, Lactobacillus and Bacteroides, and acetoin-biosynthesis, respectively. These shifts to a pro-inflammatory profile are consistent with other studies suggesting oncogenic properties. Importantly, selection of the principal source of microbial DNA is key to ensure reliable, reproducible and comparable results in microbiome studies.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer Science and Business Media LLCen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1181en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalScientific Reportsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume11en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchOncology and Carcinogenesisen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1112en_US
dc.titleDifferences in the bacteriome of swab, saliva, and tissue biopsies in oral canceren_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articlesen_US
dcterms.bibliographicCitationGopinath, D; Menon, RK; Wie, CC; Banerjee, M; Panda, S; Mandal, D; Behera, PK; Roychoudhury, S; Kheur, S; Botelho, MG; Johnson, NW, Differences in the bacteriome of swab, saliva, and tissue biopsies in oral cancer, Scientific Reports, 2021, 11 (1), pp. 1181en_US
dcterms.dateAccepted2020-12-22
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en_US
dc.date.updated2021-02-07T23:18:01Z
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)en_US
gro.rights.copyright© The Author(s) 2021. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made.en_US
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorJohnson, Newell W.


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