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dc.contributor.authorRoberts, Brigiten_US
dc.contributor.authorM. Eastwood, Glenen_US
dc.contributor.authorRaunow, Heikeen_US
dc.contributor.authorHowe, Belindaen_US
dc.contributor.authorRickard, Claireen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T12:57:59Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T12:57:59Z
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.date.modified2013-08-29T22:00:49Z
dc.identifier.issn10367314en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.aucc.2011.02.003en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/40201
dc.description.abstractIntroduction The achievement of successful clinical research projects depends on multiple team members including Research Coordinators (RCs), who are the link between the researcher and the trial participants. The RCs main responsibility is to ensure that all research is conducted according to the appropriate protocols, regulations and guidelines. Aim Description of demographics, the role and associated responsibilities and assessment of items of importance to, and satisfaction with, various job related items. Method An observational web-based cross-sectional study of RCs working in Intensive Care Units (ICU) across Australia and New Zealand. Results Fifty-six participants completed the survey. Forty percent had more than 6 years experience in ICU research and one-third held a Masters Degree. Most respondents performed research related tasks including ethics submission, patient screening, education and data collection. Autonomy and work hours were the most satisfying job characteristics reported and aspects relating to autonomy were most important for the RCs. Inadequate remuneration was of great concern to the participants. Conclusion Research Coordinators in Australia and New Zealand have many and varied roles with a significant workload. Unfortunately, the RCs do not feel their employers are adequately remunerating the demand on their time and efforts. The results indicate that RCs enjoy high levels of satisfaction with general conditions and facets of their work and its environment and they remain passionate about their role in the ICU setting.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.format.extent111513 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.publisher.placeAustraliaen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom259en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto268en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue4en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalAustralian Critical Careen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume24en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Nursing: Secondary (Acute Care)en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode111003en_US
dc.titleIntensive care research coordinators in Australia and New Zealand: a cross-sectional survey of demographics, responsibilities, job satisfaction and importanceen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2011 ACCCN. Published by Elsevier. This is the author-manuscript version of this paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal website for access to the definitive, published version.en_US
gro.date.issued2011
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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