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dc.contributor.authorHamede, Rodrigo
dc.contributor.authorMadsen, Thomas
dc.contributor.authorMcCallum, Hamish
dc.contributor.authorStorfer, Andrew
dc.contributor.authorHohenlohe, Paul A
dc.contributor.authorSiddle, Hannah
dc.contributor.authorKaufman, Jim
dc.contributor.authorGiraudeau, Mathieu
dc.contributor.authorJones, Menna
dc.contributor.authorThomas, Frederic
dc.contributor.authorUjvari, Beata
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-16T04:57:38Z
dc.date.available2021-02-16T04:57:38Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.issn0888-8892
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/cobi.13644
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/402222
dc.description.abstractModern conservation science frequently relies on genetic tools to manage imperiled populations threatened by processes such as habitat fragmentation and infectious diseases. Translocation of individuals to restore genetic diversity (genetic rescue) is increasingly used to manage vulnerable populations (Whiteley et al. 2015), but it can swamp local adaptations and lead to outbreeding depression (Frankham et al. 2011). Thus, genetic management is context dependent and needs evaluation across multiple generations (Fitzpatrick et al. 2020). Genomic studies can help evaluate the extent to which populations are locally adapted to assess the costs and benefits of translocations. Predicting the long‐term fitness effects of genetic interventions and their evolutionary consequences is a vital step in managing dwindling populations threatened by emerging infectious diseases.
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Science Foundation - USA
dc.description.sponsorshipWashington State University_NIH
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherWiley
dc.relation.ispartofjournalConservation Biology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEnvironmental Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchBiological Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchAgricultural and Veterinary Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode05
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode06
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode07
dc.subject.keywordsScience & Technology
dc.subject.keywordsLife Sciences & Biomedicine
dc.subject.keywordsBiodiversity Conservation
dc.subject.keywordsEcology
dc.titleDarwin, the devil, and the management of transmissible cancers
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC3 - Articles (Letter/ Note)
dcterms.bibliographicCitationHamede, R; Madsen, T; McCallum, H; Storfer, A; Hohenlohe, PA; Siddle, H; Kaufman, J; Giraudeau, M; Jones, M; Thomas, F; Ujvari, B, Darwin, the devil, and the management of transmissible cancers, Conservation Biology, 2020
dcterms.dateAccepted2020-08-14
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.date.updated2021-02-16T04:55:40Z
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)
gro.rights.copyright© 2020 The Authors. Conservation Biology published by Wiley Periodicals LLC on behalf of Society for Conservation Biology. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorMcCallum, Hamish


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