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dc.contributor.authorBurns, Kara
dc.contributor.authorNicholas, Rebekah
dc.contributor.authorBeatson, Amanda
dc.contributor.authorChamorro-Koc, Marianella
dc.contributor.authorBlackler, Alethea
dc.contributor.authorGottlieb, Udo
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-18T00:17:39Z
dc.date.available2021-02-18T00:17:39Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.issn1438-8871en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.2196/15307en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/402309
dc.description.abstractBackground: Interest in mobile health (mHealth) has increased recently, and research suggests that mHealth devices can enhance end-user engagement, especially when used in conjunction with brief message content. Objective: This research aims to explore the stages of engagement framework for mHealth devices and develop a method to generate brief message content to promote sustained user engagement. This study uses the framework by O’Brien and Toms as a point of departure, where engagement is defined as the uptake or the use of an mHealth device. The framework is a linear repeatable process, including point of engagement, period of engagement, disengagement, and re-engagement. Each stage is characterized by attributes related to a person’s technology experience. Although the literature has identified stages of engagement for health-related technology, few studies explore mHealth engagement. Furthermore, little research has determined a method for creating brief message content at each stage in this engagement journey. Methods: Interviews and observations from 19 participants who used mHealth technologies (apps, devices, or wellness websites) in a solo capacity were recruited for sample group 1. In sample group 2, interviews, and observations from 25 participants using mHealth technologies in a group capacity through the Global Corporate Challenge were used. These samples were investigated at 3 time points in both research contexts. The results underwent deductive-inductive thematic analysis for the engagement stages’ framework and attributes. Results: In addition to the 4 stages identified by O’Brien and Toms, 2 additional stages, self-management and limited engagement, were identified. Self-management captures where users had disengaged from their technology but were still engaged with their health activity. Limited engagement captures where group mHealth users had minimal interaction with their mHealth technology but continued to engage in a group fitness activity. The results revealed that mHealth engagement stages were nonlinear and embedded in a wider engagement context and that each stage was characterized by a combination of 49 attributes that could be organized into 8 themes. Themes documented the total user experience and included technology usability, technology features, technology aesthetics, use motivations, health awareness, goal setting, social support, and interruptions. Different themes were found to have more relevance at different engagement stages. Knowing themes and attributes at all engagement stages allows technology developers and health care professionals to generate relevant brief message content informed by a person-centered approach. Conclusions: This research extends an existing engagement stages framework and identifies attributes and themes relevant to mHealth technology users’ total user experience and incorporates concepts derived from health, business studies, and information systems literature. In addition, we offer a practical 5-step process based on a person-centered approach to develop mHealth technology brief message content for sustained engagement.en_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherJMIR Publicationsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrome15307en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue9en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Medical Internet Researchen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume22en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchInformation and Computing Sciencesen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical and Health Sciencesen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology and Cognitive Sciencesen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode08en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode11en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode17en_US
dc.subject.keywordsScience & Technologyen_US
dc.subject.keywordsLife Sciences & Biomedicineen_US
dc.subject.keywordsHealth Care Sciences & Servicesen_US
dc.subject.keywordsMedical Informaticsen_US
dc.subject.keywordsmobile healthen_US
dc.titleIdentifying Mobile Health Engagement Stages: Interviews and Observations for Developing Brief Message Contenten_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dcterms.bibliographicCitationBurns, K; Nicholas, R; Beatson, A; Chamorro-Koc, M; Blackler, A; Gottlieb, U, Identifying Mobile Health Engagement Stages: Interviews and Observations for Developing Brief Message Content, Journal of Medical Internet Research, 2020, 22 (9), pp. e15307en_US
dcterms.dateAccepted2020-07-26
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en_US
dc.date.updated2021-02-18T00:15:21Z
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)en_US
gro.rights.copyright© Kara Burns, Rebekah Nicholas, Amanda Beatson, Marianella Chamorro-Koc, Alethea Blackler, Udo Gottlieb. Originally published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research (http://www.jmir.org), 22.09.2020. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work, first published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research, is properly cited. The complete bibliographic information, a link to the original publication on http://www.jmir.org/, as well as this copyright and license information must be included.en_US
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gro.griffith.authorBurns, Kara R.


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