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dc.contributor.authorFaulkner, Simon
dc.contributor.authorBartleet, Brydie-Leigh
dc.contributor.editorBalfour, Michael
dc.contributor.editorBartleet, Brydie-Leigh
dc.contributor.editorDavey, Linda
dc.contributor.editorRynne, John
dc.contributor.editorSchippers, Huib
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-19T02:25:01Z
dc.date.available2021-02-19T02:25:01Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.isbn9781783209972
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/402315
dc.description.abstractThere is a reasonably long history of drumming programmes in prisons throughout the world. From the United States to Taiwan, documented cases of drumming programmes can be found, which highlight the physical, emotional, social and easily accessible benefits of using drumming in correctional settings. In many cases, the choice of the actual instrument plays a key role in the participants’ experience, given the drum’s accessibility and strong social dimensions. The prevalence of these drumming programmes is not surprising, given that drumming is a form of music-making that has a very long history across a number of different cultural contexts. Drum circles have been used as part of healing rituals in many cultures across the globe, and drumming is increasingly being used as a contemporary therapeutic strategy (Friedman 2000; Wood et al. 2013). These therapeutic purposes have ranged from treating a variety of behavioural issues, such as anger management, team-building and substance abuse recovery, as well as increasing self-esteem and developing leadership skills (Mikenas 2003; Wood et al. 2013). As Wood and colleagues (2013) note, drumming has also been used in therapeutic interventions with specific population groups, including the elderly (Fleming et al. 2004), substance misusers (Blackett and Payne 2005) and prisoners (Martin et al. 2014). Recent research has also examined the impact of drumming on disadvantaged adolescents’ mental wellbeing, psychological distress, post-traumatic stress symptoms and antisocial behaviour (Martin and Wood 2017). 
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.publisherIntellect
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
dc.publisher.urihttps://www.intellectbooks.com/performing-arts-in-prison
dc.relation.ispartofbooktitlePerforming Arts in Prison Creative Perspectives
dc.relation.ispartofchapter7
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom115
dc.relation.ispartofpageto132
dc.subject.fieldofresearchStudies in Creative Arts and Writing
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode19
dc.subject.keywordsPerforming Arts
dc.titleDrumming interventions in Australian prisons: Insights from the Rhythm2Recovery model
dc.typeBook chapter
dc.type.descriptionB1 - Chapters
dcterms.bibliographicCitationFaulkner, S; Bartleet, B-L, Drumming interventions in Australian prisons: Insights from the Rhythm2Recovery model, Performing Arts in Prison Creative Perspectives, 2019, pp. 115-132
dc.date.updated2021-02-18T01:12:08Z
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)
gro.rights.copyright© 2019 Intellect Books. The Author retains moral and all proprietary rights other than copyright, such as patent and trade-mark rights to any process or procedure described in the Contribution. The attached file is reproduced here with permission of the copyright owner(s)
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorBartleet, Brydie-Leigh


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