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dc.contributor.authorKainz, H
dc.contributor.authorKillen, BA
dc.contributor.authorWesseling, M
dc.contributor.authorPerez-Boerema, F
dc.contributor.authorPitto, L
dc.contributor.authorAznar, JMG
dc.contributor.authorShefelbine, S
dc.contributor.authorJonkers, I
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-18T22:22:16Z
dc.date.available2021-02-18T22:22:16Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0235966
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/402352
dc.description.abstractMulti-scale simulations, combining muscle and joint contact force (JCF) from musculoskeletal simulations with adaptive mechanobiological finite element analysis, allow to estimate musculoskeletal loading and predict femoral growth in children. Generic linearly scaled musculoskeletal models are commonly used. This approach, however, neglects subject- and age-specific musculoskeletal geometry, e.g. femoral neck-shaft angle (NSA) and anteversion angle (AVA). This study aimed to evaluate the impact of proximal femoral geometry, i.e. altered NSA and AVA, on hip JCF and femoral growth simulations. Musculoskeletal models with NSA ranging from 120° to 150° and AVA ranging from 20° to 50° were created and used to calculate muscle and hip JCF based on the gait analysis data of a typically developing child. A finite element model of a paediatric femur was created from magnetic resonance images. The finite element model was morphed to the geometries of the different musculoskeletal models and used for mechanobiological finite element analysis to predict femoral growth trends. Our findings showed that hip JCF increase with increasing NSA and AVA. Furthermore, the orientation of the hip JCF followed the orientation of the femoral neck axis. Consequently, the osteogenic index, which is a function of cartilage stresses and defines the growth rate, barely changed with altered NSA and AVA. Nevertheless, growth predictions were sensitive to the femoral geometry due to changes in the predicted growth directions. Altered NSA had a bigger impact on the growth results than altered AVA. Growth simulations based on mechanobiological principles were in agreement with reported changes in paediatric populations.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageeng
dc.publisherPublic Library of Science (PLoS)
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrome0235966
dc.relation.ispartofjournalPLoS One
dc.relation.ispartofvolume15
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1103
dc.titleA multi-scale modelling framework combining musculoskeletal rigid-body simulations with adaptive finite element analyses, to evaluate the impact of femoral geometry on hip joint contact forces and femoral bone growth
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationKainz, H; Killen, BA; Wesseling, M; Perez-Boerema, F; Pitto, L; Aznar, JMG; Shefelbine, S; Jonkers, I, A multi-scale modelling framework combining musculoskeletal rigid-body simulations with adaptive finite element analyses, to evaluate the impact of femoral geometry on hip joint contact forces and femoral bone growth, PLoS Multi-scale simulations, combining muscle and joint contact force (JCF) from musculoskeletal simulations with adaptive mechanobiological finite element analysis, allow to estimate musculoskeletal loading and predict femoral growth in children. Generic linearly scaled musculoskeletal models are commonly used. This approach, however, neglects subject- and age-specific musculoskeletal geometry, e.g. femoral neck-shaft angle (NSA) and anteversion angle (AVA). This study aimed to evaluate the impact of proximal femoral geometry, i.e. altered NSA and AVA, on hip JCF and femoral growth simulations. Musculoskeletal models with NSA ranging from 120° to 150° and AVA ranging from 20° to 50° were created and used to calculate muscle and hip JCF based on the gait analysis data of a typically developing child. A finite element model of a paediatric femur was created from magnetic resonance images. The finite element model was morphed to the geometries of the different musculoskeletal models and used for mechanobiological finite element analysis to predict femoral growth trends. Our findings showed that hip JCF increase with increasing NSA and AVA. Furthermore, the orientation of the hip JCF followed the orientation of the femoral neck axis. Consequently, the osteogenic index, which is a function of cartilage stresses and defines the growth rate, barely changed with altered NSA and AVA. Nevertheless, growth predictions were sensitive to the femoral geometry due to changes in the predicted growth directions. Altered NSA had a bigger impact on the growth results than altered AVA. Growth simulations based on mechanobiological principles were in agreement with reported changes in paediatric populations., 2020, 15, pp. e0235966
dcterms.dateAccepted2020-06-25
dc.date.updated2021-02-18T22:07:21Z
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)
gro.rights.copyright© 2020 Kainz et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorKillen, Bryce A.


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