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dc.contributor.authorBarrett, Christine
dc.contributor.editorGildart, Keith
dc.contributor.editorGough-Yates, Anna
dc.contributor.editorLincoln, Sian
dc.contributor.editorOsgerby, Bill
dc.contributor.editorRobinson, Lucy
dc.contributor.editorStreet, John
dc.contributor.editorWebb, Peter
dc.contributor.editorWorley, Matthew
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-19T01:27:11Z
dc.date.available2021-02-19T01:27:11Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.isbn9783030284749en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/978-3-030-28475-6en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/402385
dc.description.abstractDick Hebdige’s highly influential 1979 book Subculture: The Meaning of Style has been critiqued for neglecting the female experience of subcultural formations. As a corrective, this chapter seeks to inscribe young women’s presence and participation in punk (and other traditional youth subcultures) into Hebdige’s text. The first section offers a close reading of this landmark book to better understand, despite its focus on young men, how girls and women are briefly mentioned in the text. Next, the women of punk are considered—particularly musicians and performers from the original UK scene of the mid-to-late 1970s—and how they used punk style sartorially and musically as a “signifying practice” to both navigate and subvert gender identity. While other postwar subcultures are chronicled and analyzed in the book, punk is Hebdige’s primary case study and, therefore, this discussion stays true to that focus. The final section looks at how female scholars have responded directly to Hebdige’s book in their own work on subcultures, fashion and sport. Subculture: The Meaning of Style remains a source of inspiration, if not an open-ended invitation, to write women’s experiences into subcultural history. As if in punk, contrarian fashion, Hebdige’s book on (mostly male) subcultural style and practice has, in fact, given “untypical girls” new spaces to be seen, heard and valued in all their subversive glory.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.publisherPalgrave Macmillanen_US
dc.publisher.placeCham, Switzerlanden_US
dc.relation.ispartofbooktitleHebdige and Subculture in the Twenty-First Century: Through the Subcultural Lensen_US
dc.relation.ispartofchapter6en_US
dc.relation.ispartofchapternumbers12en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom93en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto111en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesPalgrave Studies in the History of Subcultures and Popular Musicen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCultural Studiesen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchSociologyen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCommunication and Media Studiesen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode2002en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1608en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode2001en_US
dc.subject.keywordssubculturesen_US
dc.subject.keywordsgenderen_US
dc.subject.keywordspopular musicen_US
dc.titleWhere the (Untypical) Girls Are: Inscribing Women’s Experiences into Dick Hebdige’s Subculture: The Meaning of Styleen_US
dc.typeBook chapteren_US
dc.type.descriptionB1 - Chaptersen_US
dcterms.bibliographicCitationBarrett, C, Where the (Untypical) Girls Are: Inscribing Women’s Experiences into Dick Hebdige’s Subculture: The Meaning of Style, Hebdige and Subculture in the Twenty-First Century: Through the Subcultural Lens, 2020, pp. 93-111en_US
dc.date.updated2021-02-19T00:34:18Z
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorBarrett, Christine J.


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