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dc.contributor.authorTatham, Peteren_US
dc.contributor.authorHoughton, Lukeen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T13:27:56Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T13:27:56Z
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.date.modified2011-10-20T06:39:46Z
dc.identifier.issn20426747en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1108/20426741111122394en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/40250
dc.description.abstractPurpose - Some 40 years ago Horst Rittel and Melvin Webber published a seminal paper in which they discussed the "wicked problems" facing those who sought to develop solutions to urban planning challenges. Their work recognised that many of the decisions faced by modern management are multifaceted, and involve a plethora of stakeholders each with a diverse view of what good might look like. The aim of this paper is to consider how the ensuing rich vein of literature relating to the management of such problems might be applied to the logistic challenges of preparing for and responding to a disaster. Design/methodology/approach - This paper first examines the issues, dilemmas and decisions facing the humanitarian logistician, as a key component of the preparation and response to a disaster, and concludes that they fall firmly into the ambit of a wicked problem. The paper then reviews the literature that proposes methods for management of such problems, and applies it to the humanitarian logistics field. Findings - The paper concludes that further research is needed to understand the ways in which the three primary approaches of employing authoritative, competitive and collaborative strategies might be best evaluated and employed. In doing so, it recognises that it is essential to engage with the broader disaster management and humanitarian logistic communities in order to help operationalise this theoretical approach. Originality/value - While the concept of a wicked problem and the associated broad spectrum of literature has developed over a considerable period of time, this has not previously been applied to the challenge of humanitarian logistics which, it is argued, meets all the criteria to be considered as a truly wicked problem.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent352109 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherEmeralden_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom15en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto31en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Managementen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume1en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchLogistics and Supply Chain Managementen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode150309en_US
dc.titleThe wicked problem of humanitarian logistics and disaster relief aiden_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Business School, Department of International Business and Asian Studiesen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2011 Emerald. This is the author-manuscript version of this paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.en_AU
gro.date.issued2011
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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