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dc.contributor.authorA. Cole, Simonen_US
dc.contributor.authorWelling, Maxen_US
dc.contributor.authorDioso-Villa, Rachelen_US
dc.contributor.authorCarpenter, Roberten_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T15:53:11Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T15:53:11Z
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.date.modified2011-08-24T07:13:53Z
dc.identifier.issn14708396en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/lpr/mgn004en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/40256
dc.description.abstractEfforts to harness computer fingerprint databases to perform studies relevant to fingerprint identification have tended to focus on 10-print, rather than latent print, identification or on the inherent individuality of fingerprint images. This paper reports on three experiments that measure the accuracy of a computer fingerprint matcher at identifying the source of simulated latent prints. The first experiment used rolled prints supplied by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to simulate latent prints. The second experiment used our own manufactured latent prints. The third experiment used latent prints supplied by NIST. An Automated Fingerprint Identification System (AFIS) was used to simulate the task that a human latent print examiner is typically asked to perform as part of ordinary casework. The AFIS performed this task, for which it was not designed, fairly well. However, there are non-mate images that scored very highly on the AFIS's similarity measure. These images would be susceptible to erroneous conclusions that would be given with a very high degree of confidence. Not surprisingly, the same was also true of the simulated latents which contained less information. We suggest that measuring the accuracy and potential for erroneous conclusions for AFISs might provide a basis for comparison between human examiners and automated systems at performing various identification tasks. Such comparisons might stimulate competition, innovation and improvement in the performance of these tasks.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherOxford University Pressen_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom165en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto189en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue3en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalLaw, Probability and Risken_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume7en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCriminology not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode160299en_US
dc.titleBeyond the individuality of fingerprints: a measure of simulated computer latent print source attribution accuracyen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.date.issued2008
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


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