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dc.contributor.authorKannian, P
dc.contributor.authorLavanya, C
dc.contributor.authorRavichandran, K
dc.contributor.authorBagavad Gita, J
dc.contributor.authorMahanathi, P
dc.contributor.authorAshwini, V
dc.contributor.authorKumarasamy, N
dc.contributor.authorRajan, G
dc.contributor.authorRanganathan, K
dc.contributor.authorChallacombe, SJ
dc.contributor.authorWebster-Cyriaque, J
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, NW
dc.date.accessioned2021-03-07T23:14:43Z
dc.date.available2021-03-07T23:14:43Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.issn1354-523Xen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/odi.13793en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/402873
dc.description.abstractDear Editor, SARS‐CoV2, transmitted through respiratory secretions within close contacts, primarily infects epithelial/endothelial cells lining the respiratory mucosae. Nasopharyngeal swab (NPS), the favoured sample for reverse transcriptase‐polymerase chain reaction (RT‐PCR) retrieves SARS‐CoV2‐infected cells with minimal aerosol formation (Wang et al. 2020; CDC guidelines, 2020). However, NPS collection is somewhat invasive with discomfort, requires medical/technical expertise, and might not be feasible in remote villages, especially in developing countries like India. On the other hand, epithelial cells of the oral mucosa abundantly carry angiotensin converting enzyme‐2 (ACE‐2) receptors that bind SARS‐CoV2 (Huang et al. 2020; Xu et al. 2020). Whole mouth fluid (WMF) is used for diagnosis in many diseases (Azzi et al. 2020; Malamud & Rodriguez‐Chavez, 2011). Its non‐invasive, self‐collectable and low transmission risk makes WMF attractive for diagnosis of Covid‐19 (To et al. 2020). Early and quick detection of SARS‐CoV2 is of prime importance in containing its spread. Currently, most rapid antigen kits are validated for NPS specimens. In this study, we evaluated the utility of a SARS‐CoV2 antigen kit using drooled WMF samples from laboratory‐confirmed SARS‐CoV2 RT‐PCR positive patients.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherWileyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalOral Diseasesen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchDentistryen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1105en_US
dc.subject.keywordsSARS-CoV2en_US
dc.subject.keywordsantigen testen_US
dc.subject.keywordswhole mouth fluiden_US
dc.titleSARS-CoV2 antigen in whole mouth fluid may be a reliable rapid detection tool (Letter)en_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articlesen_US
dcterms.bibliographicCitationKannian, P; Lavanya, C; Ravichandran, K; Bagavad Gita, J; Mahanathi, P; Ashwini, V; Kumarasamy, N; Rajan, G; Ranganathan, K; Challacombe, SJ; Webster-Cyriaque, J; Johnson, NW, SARS-CoV2 antigen in whole mouth fluid may be a reliable rapid detection tool (Letter), Oral Diseases, 2021en_US
dcterms.dateAccepted2021-01-28
dc.date.updated2021-03-04T21:35:29Z
dc.description.versionSubmitted Manuscript (SM)en_US
gro.description.notepublicThis publication has been entered in Griffith Research Online as an advanced online version.en_US
gro.rights.copyright© 2021 John Wiley & Sons A/S. This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: SARS‐CoV2 antigen in whole mouth fluid may be a reliable rapid detection tool, Oral Diseases, https://doi.org/10.1111/odi.13793, which has been published in final form at DOI. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving (http://olabout.wiley.com/WileyCDA/Section/id-828039.html)en_US
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorJohnson, Newell W.


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