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dc.contributor.authorAl-Hebshi, NN
dc.contributor.authorBorgnakke, WS
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, NW
dc.date.accessioned2021-03-08T01:40:16Z
dc.date.available2021-03-08T01:40:16Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.issn2196-3002en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s40496-019-0215-5en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/402917
dc.description.abstractPurpose of Review: This decade has witnessed increasing interest in the potential role of the oral microbiome in head and neck cancers, particularly oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Most studies have focused on the bacterial component of the microbiome (bacteriome), but the fungal component (mycobiome) is also receiving attention. In this review, we provide an overview of mechanisms by which the microbiome can contribute to oral carcinogenesis, and summarize results from clinical studies, especially focusing on those reporting functional microbiome analysis. Synthesizing and illustrating the evidence, we also suggest a new “passenger-turning-driver” functional model for the role of the microbiome in oral cancer. Recent Findings: In vitro studies provide convincing evidence for the carcinogenicity of the periodontal bacteria Fusobacterium nucleatum and Porphyromonas gingivalis. However, results from clinical studies are inconsistent, with significant variations in composition of the microbiome associated with oral cancer. Methodological differences may partially explain the differing conclusion. However, variations observed may also reflect functional redundancy: the phenomenon that different species may be enriched in different samples, but still serve the same functions. Indeed, functional analyses of the bacteriome associated with oral cancer have revealed more consistent results, namely enrichment of a virulent, inflammatory bacteriome in the tumors. Summary: Apart from oncoviruses associated with a special entity of oral cancer, no consistent evidence implicates specific microbial species in OSCC etiology. Instead, the disturbed function of an initially “passenger” microbiome within the tumor microenvironment likely contributes to tumor progression by sustaining chronic inflammation.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.languageenen_US
dc.publisherSpringer Science and Business Media LLCen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom145en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto160en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue2en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalCurrent Oral Health Reportsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume6en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchDentistryen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Sciencesen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1105en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1103en_US
dc.titleThe Microbiome of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinomas: a Functional Perspectiveen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articlesen_US
dcterms.bibliographicCitationAl-Hebshi, NN; Borgnakke, WS; Johnson, NW, The Microbiome of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinomas: a Functional Perspective, Current Oral Health Reports, 2019, 6 (2), pp. 145-160en_US
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en_US
dc.date.updated2021-03-05T05:13:39Z
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)en_US
gro.rights.copyright© The Author(s) 2019. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.en_US
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorJohnson, Newell W.


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