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dc.contributor.authorCoyer, F
dc.contributor.authorCook, JL
dc.contributor.authorDoubrovsky, A
dc.contributor.authorCampbell, J
dc.contributor.authorVann, A
dc.contributor.authorMcNamara, G
dc.date.accessioned2021-03-12T01:55:57Z
dc.date.available2021-03-12T01:55:57Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.issn1036-7314
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.aucc.2018.02.008
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/403009
dc.description.abstractBackground: Skin integrity management is often a low clinical priority in the intensive care environment, possibly resulting in high pressure injury (PI) prevalence. This article reports the results of the first phase of a multiphased project, “Translating evidence-based pressure injury prevention strategies to the intensive care environment (SUSTAIN study)”. The SUSTAIN study used a research translation framework to guide the assessment of research uptake, development, and monitoring of translational strategies to reduce PIs. Objective: The objective was to assess the enablers and barriers to research translation of evidence-based skin integrity management in one Australian tertiary referral intensive care unit (ICU). Methods: This exploratory study was conducted in an Australian metropolitan tertiary ICU on a sample of 204 registered nurses. Data were collected using (i) a descriptive cross-sectional cohort survey of barriers, enablers, and attitudes to PI prevention, (ii) a cross-sectional survey of PI knowledge, and (iii) focus groups to understand the local contextual factors impacting registered nurses’ PI prevention practice. Results: Participants reported a moderate to high ability to rise above barriers in PI prevention, a positive attitude towards PI prevention, and considered this a priority in their care of patients. High patient acuity emerged as a barrier to implementing timely PI prevention strategies. In the knowledge, test participants with postgraduate qualifications answered more statements correctly. Focus group data revealed four themes: (i) team ICU, (ii) processes of care, (iii) education for consistency, and (iv) the patient. Conclusions: It is essential that evidence-based PI prevention strategies are provided in the intensive care environment. Our findings indicate that despite positive attitudes and sound knowledge levels, high patient acuity is a significant barrier to evidence implementation.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageeng
dc.publisherElsevier BV
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom122
dc.relation.ispartofpageto130
dc.relation.ispartofissue2
dc.relation.ispartofjournalAustralian Critical Care
dc.relation.ispartofvolume32
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchNursing
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1103
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1110
dc.subject.keywordsBarriers
dc.subject.keywordsEnablers
dc.subject.keywordsIntensive care
dc.subject.keywordsPressure injury
dc.subject.keywordsResearch translation
dc.titleUnderstanding contextual barriers and enablers to pressure injury prevention practice in an Australian intensive care unit: An exploratory study
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationCoyer, F; Cook, JL; Doubrovsky, A; Campbell, J; Vann, A; McNamara, G, Understanding contextual barriers and enablers to pressure injury prevention practice in an Australian intensive care unit: An exploratory study, Australian Critical Care, 2019, 32 (2), pp. 122-130
dcterms.dateAccepted2018-02-05
dcterms.licensehttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.date.updated2021-03-09T04:38:12Z
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript (AM)
gro.rights.copyright© 2019 Australian College of Critical Care Nurses Ltd. Published by Elsevier Australia. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International Licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/) which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, providing that the work is properly cited.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorCampbell, Jill L.


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