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dc.contributor.authorSmith, Julia
dc.contributor.authorDavies, Sara E
dc.contributor.authorFeng, Huiyun
dc.contributor.authorGan, Connie CR
dc.contributor.authorGrépin, Karen A
dc.contributor.authorHarman, Sophie
dc.contributor.authorHerten-Crabb, Asha
dc.contributor.authorMorgan, Rosemary
dc.contributor.authorVandan, Nimisha
dc.contributor.authorWenham, Clare
dc.date.accessioned2021-03-14T23:24:54Z
dc.date.available2021-03-14T23:24:54Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.issn1744-1692
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/17441692.2021.1896765
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/403130
dc.description.abstractGender norms, roles and relations differentially affect women, men, and non-binary individuals' vulnerability to disease. Outbreak response measures also have immediate and long-term gendered effects. However, gender-based analysis of outbreaks and responses is limited by lack of data and little integration of feminist analysis within global health scholarship. Recognising these barriers, this paper applies a gender matrix methodology, grounded in feminist political economy approaches, to evaluate the gendered effects of the COVID-19 pandemic and response in four case studies: China, Hong Kong, Canada, and the UK. Through a rapid scoping of documentation of the gendered effects of the outbreak, it applies the matrix framework to analyse findings, identifying common themes across the case studies: financial discrimination, crisis in care, and unequal risks and secondary effects. Results point to transnational structural conditions which put women on the front lines of the pandemic at work and at home while denying them health, economic and personal security - effects that are exacerbated where racism and other forms of discrimination intersect with gender inequities. Given that women and people living at the intersections of multiple inequities are made additionally vulnerable by pandemic responses, intersectional feminist responses should be prioritised at the beginning of any crises.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.sponsorshipSimon Fraser University_CIHR
dc.languageeng
dc.publisherInforma UK Limited
dc.relation.ispartofjournalGlob Public Health
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic Health and Health Services
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1117
dc.subject.keywordsCOVID-19
dc.subject.keywordsGender
dc.subject.keywordsfeminist
dc.subject.keywordspolitical economy
dc.subject.keywordswomen
dc.titleMore than a public health crisis: A feminist political economic analysis of COVID-19
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationSmith, J; Davies, SE; Feng, H; Gan, CCR; Grépin, KA; Harman, S; Herten-Crabb, A; Morgan, R; Vandan, N; Wenham, C, More than a public health crisis: A feminist political economic analysis of COVID-19, Glob Public Health, 2021
dcterms.licensehttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.date.updated2021-03-13T23:10:32Z
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)
gro.description.notepublicThis publication has been entered in Griffith Research Online as an advanced online version.
gro.rights.copyright© 2021 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, and is not altered, transformed, or built upon in any way.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorDavies, Sara E.
gro.griffith.authorFeng, Huiyun
gro.griffith.authorGan, Connie


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