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dc.contributor.authorBennett, Andy
dc.contributor.authorCashman, David
dc.contributor.authorLewandowski, Natalie
dc.contributor.editorVanLuyn, A
dc.contributor.editorDelaFuente, E
dc.date.accessioned2021-03-18T02:48:23Z
dc.date.available2021-03-18T02:48:23Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.isbn978-1-138-31067-4en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.4324/9780429459290-14en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/403262
dc.description.abstractThe creative industries in regional areas operate in a different fashion to those in urban areas, and this is nowhere more clear than in regional music scenes. The very nature is different. Instead of having multiple venues scattered at accessibly small distances, a gig in the next town may be a four-hour drive. Musicians need to be more versatile, more flexible, and more willing to work as a solo act. However, relatively little is known about music scenes in these areas due to the underrepresentation of this topic in the literature. This paper is based on the results of an eight-month research project that interviewed musicians, venue owners, and music businesses in the Central Queensland area of Australia. It finds that there are some difficulties with being a performing musician in a regional area. Regional musicians tend to travel more, perform for lower fees, and be more reliant on portfolio careers and solo performance. They are also more vulnerable to economic downturn in the area, such as the decline in the mining boom in Central Queensland. However, they may gig regularly with less competition than their urban counterparts. Their performances are significantly cheaper compared to bringing in musicians from Brisbane to perform in the regions. In very remote areas, a skilful musician is a valued commodity for the area. In summary, this paper thus provides important insights regarding the socio-economic and spatial challenges confronting music scenes particularly, and creative industries broadly, in remote and regional areas.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherRoutledgeen_US
dc.relation.ispartofbooktitleRegional Cultures, Economies, and Creativity: Innovating Through Place in Australia and Beyonden_US
dc.relation.ispartofchapter13en_US
dc.relation.ispartofchapternumbers14en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom259en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto269en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchStudies in Creative Arts and Writingen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode19en_US
dc.subject.keywordsArts & Humanitiesen_US
dc.subject.keywordsSocial Sciencesen_US
dc.subject.keywordsHumanities, Multidisciplinaryen_US
dc.subject.keywordsCultural Studiesen_US
dc.subject.keywordsArts & Humanities - Other Topicsen_US
dc.titleOne piece blokes: On being a performing musician in regional Queenslanden_US
dc.typeBook chapteren_US
dc.type.descriptionB1 - Chaptersen_US
dcterms.bibliographicCitationBennett, A; Cashman, D; Lewandowski, N, One piece blokes: On being a performing musician in regional Queensland, Regional Cultures, Economies, and Creativity: Innovating Through Place in Australia and Beyond, 2020, pp. 259-269en_US
dc.date.updated2021-03-18T02:44:04Z
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorBennett, Andy A.


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