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dc.contributor.authorJefferies, Lisa N
dc.contributor.authorAmbrose, Mathea
dc.contributor.authorDi Lollo, Vincent
dc.date.accessioned2021-04-01T02:30:57Z
dc.date.available2021-04-01T02:30:57Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.issn0340-0727
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00426-021-01500-x
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/403489
dc.description.abstractThe focus of attention can be either unitary or divided and can transition from unitary to divided while performing a task. In Experiment 1, we investigated whether alerting hastens the transition from unitary to divided attention. To this end, we employed a dual-RSVP-stream Attentional Blink task (AB; impaired perception of the second of two rapidly sequential targets) with two pairs of letter targets (T1-pair and T2-pair). One component of the AB known as Lag-1 sparing (unimpaired perception of the T2-pair when it is presented directly after the T1-pair) occurs only when the T2-pair falls in an attended location. When the T2-pair falls in an unattended location, the converse pattern occurs (Lag-1 deficit). Accordingly, we used the incidence of Lag-1 sparing/deficit to index whether a location was attended or unattended. We found that presenting a brief brightening flash of the screen (alerting) just before the T1-pair hastened the transition from the initial unitary focus to a divided focus. In Experiment 2, we pitted the hastening account against an alternative hypothesis that the flash triggers phasic activation of the Locus Coeruleus-norepinephrine neuromodulatory system, thus resetting the underlying neural networks that mediate the distribution of attention, triggering a switch from unitary to divided attention. The results of Experiment 2 were incompatible with the hastening account, but consistent with the network-reset account.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageeng
dc.publisherSpringer Science and Business Media LLC
dc.relation.ispartofjournalPsychological Research
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCognitive Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1701
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1702
dc.titleWhat factors influence the switch from unitary to divided attention?
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationJefferies, LN; Ambrose, M; Di Lollo, V, What factors influence the switch from unitary to divided attention?, Psychological Research, 2021
dcterms.dateAccepted2021-03-02
dc.date.updated2021-03-29T04:13:45Z
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript (AM)
gro.description.notepublicThis publication has been entered as an advanced online version in Griffith Research Online.
gro.rights.copyright© 2021 Bspringer Berlin Heidelberg. This is an electronic version of an article published in Psychological Research, 2021. Psychological Research is available online at: http://link.springer.com/ with the open URL of your article.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorJefferies, Lisa
gro.griffith.authorAmbrose, Mathea I.


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