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dc.contributor.authorHalpin, Samuel
dc.contributor.authorMitchell, Amy E
dc.contributor.authorBaker, Sabine
dc.contributor.authorMorawska, Alina
dc.date.accessioned2021-04-14T23:07:53Z
dc.date.available2021-04-14T23:07:53Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.issn1062-1024en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10826-020-01881-4en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/403609
dc.description.abstractThe impact of excessive screen use on child health and development is now a public health concern, and research efforts are focused on finding ways to moderate screen use. To date, the focus has mainly been on school-aged children and adolescents, and the early childhood context has been comparatively neglected. Moreover, relationships between factors likely to influence screen use by young children (e.g., child behaviour, parenting style and self-efficacy) remain largely unexplored. Our study aimed to test relationships between parenting style, parents’ self-efficacy, parental distress, child behaviour, and young children’s screen time. We used a cross-sectional study design. Parents (N = 106) of young children (aged 0–4 years) living in Australia completed an online survey which assessed parent-reported child screen use, screen time-related child behaviour problems, parents’ self-efficacy for managing child behaviour and screen time, parents’ beliefs about the positive/negative effects of screen time, parenting style, general child adjustment and parent efficacy, and parent distress. Correlation coefficients revealed relationships between dysfunctional parenting styles, screen time-related child behaviour problems, and parent self-efficacy for dealing with these behaviours. Using hierarchical multiple regression models, children’s screen time behaviour problems explained the greatest variance in parents’ self-efficacy for managing screen time, and parents’ self-efficacy for managing child screen time explained the greatest variance in parent-reported child screen time. Further research is needed to disentangle these relationships; however, preliminary results suggest that child behaviour difficulties and parents’ self-efficacy warrant further investigation as potentially useful targets for interventions aiming to improve screen use in early childhood.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherSpringeren_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom824en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto838en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue3en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Child and Family Studiesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume30en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic Health and Health Servicesen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychologyen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchLinguisticsen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1117en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1701en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode2004en_US
dc.subject.keywordsSocial Sciencesen_US
dc.subject.keywordsScience & Technologyen_US
dc.subject.keywordsLife Sciences & Biomedicineen_US
dc.subject.keywordsFamily Studiesen_US
dc.subject.keywordsPsychology, Developmentalen_US
dc.titleParenting and Child Behaviour Barriers to Managing Screen Time With Young Childrenen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articlesen_US
dcterms.bibliographicCitationHalpin, S; Mitchell, AE; Baker, S; Morawska, A, Parenting and Child Behaviour Barriers to Managing Screen Time With Young Children, Journal of Child and Family Studies, 2021, 30 (3), pp. 824-838en_US
dc.date.updated2021-04-07T01:27:07Z
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript (AM)en_US
gro.rights.copyright© 2021 Springer Netherlands. This is an electronic version of an article published in Journal of Child and Family Studies, 2021, 30 (3), pp. 824-838. Journal of Child and Family Studies is available online at: http://link.springer.com/ with the open URL of your article.en_US
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gro.griffith.authorMitchell, Amy


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