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dc.contributor.authorBleasdale, M
dc.contributor.authorRichter, KK
dc.contributor.authorJanzen, A
dc.contributor.authorBrown, S
dc.contributor.authorScott, A
dc.contributor.authorZech, J
dc.contributor.authorWilkin, S
dc.contributor.authorWang, K
dc.contributor.authorSchiffels, S
dc.contributor.authorDesideri, J
dc.contributor.authorBesse, M
dc.contributor.authorReinold, J
dc.contributor.authorSaad, M
dc.contributor.authorPetraglia, M
dc.contributor.authoret al.
dc.date.accessioned2021-04-20T01:48:50Z
dc.date.available2021-04-20T01:48:50Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.issn2041-1723
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s41467-020-20682-3
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/403849
dc.description.abstractConsuming the milk of other species is a unique adaptation of Homo sapiens, with implications for health, birth spacing and evolution. Key questions nonetheless remain regarding the origins of dairying and its relationship to the genetically-determined ability to drink milk into adulthood through lactase persistence (LP). As a major centre of LP diversity, Africa is of significant interest to the evolution of dairying. Here we report proteomic evidence for milk consumption in ancient Africa. Using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) we identify dairy proteins in human dental calculus from northeastern Africa, directly demonstrating milk consumption at least six millennia ago. Our findings indicate that pastoralist groups were drinking milk as soon as herding spread into eastern Africa, at a time when the genetic adaptation for milk digestion was absent or rare. Our study links LP status in specific ancient individuals with direct evidence for their consumption of dairy products.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageeng
dc.publisherSpringer Science and Business Media LLC
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom632
dc.relation.ispartofissue1
dc.relation.ispartofjournalNature Communications
dc.relation.ispartofvolume12
dc.subject.fieldofresearchAnthropology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode4401
dc.titleAncient proteins provide evidence of dairy consumption in eastern Africa
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationBleasdale, M; Richter, KK; Janzen, A; Brown, S; Scott, A; Zech, J; Wilkin, S; Wang, K; Schiffels, S; Desideri, J; Besse, M; Reinold, J; Saad, M; Petraglia, M; et al., Ancient proteins provide evidence of dairy consumption in eastern Africa, Nature Communications, 2021, 12 (1), pp. 632-
dcterms.dateAccepted2020-12-10
dcterms.licensehttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.date.updated2021-04-19T22:54:21Z
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)
gro.rights.copyright© The Author(s) 2021. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorPetraglia, Michael


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