Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorHagger, Martin S
dc.date.accessioned2021-04-22T06:49:59Z
dc.date.available2021-04-22T06:49:59Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.issn1743-7199en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/17437199.2016.1244647en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/403911
dc.description.abstractThe rise of dual-process or dual-systems theories of behaviour in health psychology reflects a shift in attention from the predominant social cognitive approach in recognition of the pervasive effects that non-conscious and implicit factors have on health behaviour (Deutsch, Gawronski, & Hofmann, 2017; Sheeran, Gollwitzer, & Bargh, 2013). Dual-process theories purport that individuals’ behaviour is controlled by two processes or ‘systems’: a deliberative or reflective process which represents rational, deliberative, and conscious decision-making influences on action and an implicit or impulsive process which represents well-learned, spontaneous, and non-conscious influences (Khaneman, 2011; Hagger, 2017; Sherman, Gawronski, & Trope, 2014; Strack & Deutsch, 2004). The notion that individuals’ actions are, at least in part, determined by factors and processes that occur beyond an individual’s awareness is not new. Many theories of human behaviour have acknowledged these non-conscious influences. Behaviourism, for example, focuses exclusively on conditioning and the cues that lead to action and do not countenance any deliberation or cognitive input (Bargh & Ferguson, 2000). The rise of the cognitive approach with its information processing metaphor for action as a preeminent paradigm in psychology resulted in a concomitant shift towards the adoption social cognitive theories in to understand social behaviour, and it has come to be the dominant approach in many applied areas including health (Armitage, 2015; Biddle, Hagger, Chatzisarantis, & Lippke, 2007; Conner & Norman, 2015; Fishbein & Ajzen, 2009; Head & Noar, 2014). Nevertheless, within the social cognitive approaches, attitude theorists recognised the importance of non-conscious influences on behaviour, and that an exclusive focus on cognition and deliberation did not provide a comprehensive or realistic account for social behaviour (Aarts & Dijksterhuis, 2000; Bargh, Chaiken, Govender, & Pratto, 1992; Doll & Ajzen, 1992; Fazio, Sanbonmatsu, Powell, & Kardes, 1986). Furthermore, cognitive psychologists, particularly those conducting research and developing theory in the fields of priming, recognised the contribution of non-conscious processes to action and decision-making. Clear recognition of the control over mechanisms that occur beyond individuals’ awareness is illustrated in the characterisation of people as ‘cognitive misers’ (Bless & Schwarz, 1999; Petty & Cacioppo, 1986b). Automatic control over mundane actions is hypothesised to ‘free up’ cognitive space for high-priority, higher order action, and decision-making that is strategic and services survival goals, giving the development of non-conscious control over action an evolutionary function.en_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherRoutledge: Taylor & Francis Groupen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom375en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto380en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue4en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalHealth Psychology Reviewen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume10en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychologyen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1701en_US
dc.subject.keywordsSocial Sciencesen_US
dc.subject.keywordsPsychology, Clinicalen_US
dc.subject.keywordsGOAL-DIRECTED BEHAVIORen_US
dc.subject.keywordsSELF-REGULATIONen_US
dc.titleNon-conscious processes and dual-process theories in health psychologyen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC3 - Articles (Letter/ Note)en_US
dcterms.bibliographicCitationHagger, MS, Non-conscious processes and dual-process theories in health psychology, Health Psychology Review, 2016, 10 (4), pp. 375-380en_US
dc.date.updated2021-04-22T05:44:55Z
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript (AM)en_US
gro.rights.copyrightThis is an Author's Accepted Manuscript of an article published in Health Psychology Review, 10 (4), pp. 375-380, 27 Oct 2016, copyright Taylor & Francis, available online at: https://doi.org/10.1080/17437199.2016.1244647en_US
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorHagger, Martin S.


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record