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dc.contributor.authorMurphy, K
dc.date.accessioned2021-05-12T00:16:56Z
dc.date.available2021-05-12T00:16:56Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.issn0022-4537en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/josi.12436en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/404228
dc.description.abstractPolice rely on citizens to report crime and victimization. Yet for many people low levels of trust in police and concerns about unjust police treatment impact their willingness to engage proactively with police. For some, defying police authority is common. This can be particularly so for ethnic, racial, and religious minority groups. The personal and vicarious experiences these groups have with police play an important role in the legal socialization process, shaping how they perceive and behave toward police. As a religious minority group Muslims have experienced intense scrutiny from police. As such, the current study examines how and why Muslims defy police authority. Using survey data from 398 Australian Muslims, this study tests whether Muslims’ concerns about procedural justice and bounded-authority violations (i.e., the belief that police overstep the boundaries of acceptable authority) have differential effects on two types of defiance: resistance and disengagement. Findings show that Muslims’ concerns about procedural justice are most important for understanding resistance, while disengagement is dominated by concerns about perceived boundary violations. Further, procedural justice moderates the association between bounded-authority concerns and resistance, but not disengagement. The implications of these findings for the legal socialization process, theory, and police practice are discussed.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.languageenen_US
dc.publisherWileyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Social Issuesen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCriminologyen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchSociologyen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychologyen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1602en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1608en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1701en_US
dc.titleScrutiny, legal socialization, and defiance: Understanding how procedural justice and bounded-authority concerns shape Muslims’ defiance toward policeen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articlesen_US
dcterms.bibliographicCitationMurphy, K, Scrutiny, legal socialization, and defiance: Understanding how procedural justice and bounded-authority concerns shape Muslims’ defiance toward police, Journal of Social Issues, 2021en_US
dc.date.updated2021-05-09T22:55:51Z
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript (AM)en_US
gro.description.notepublicThis publication has been entered in Griffith Research Online as an advanced online version.en_US
gro.rights.copyright© 2021 The Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues. This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Scrutiny, legal socialization, and defiance: Understanding how procedural justice and bounded-authority concerns shape Muslims’ defiance toward police, Journal of Social Issues, 2021, which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1111/josi.12436. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving (http://olabout.wiley.com/WileyCDA/Section/id-828039.html)en_US
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorMurphy, Kristina


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