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dc.contributor.authorChatzisarantis, Nikos LD
dc.contributor.authorKamarova, Sviatlana
dc.contributor.authorTwomey, Chris
dc.contributor.authorHansen, Graham
dc.contributor.authorHarris, Mark
dc.contributor.authorWindus, John
dc.contributor.authorBateson, Alan
dc.contributor.authorHagger, Martin S
dc.date.accessioned2021-05-11T00:57:02Z
dc.date.available2021-05-11T00:57:02Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.issn2512-8442en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1027/2512-8442/a000058en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/404274
dc.description.abstractBackground: Previous research has documented that unemployed individuals who engage in recreational activities, either alone or with others, experience higher levels of mental health and psychological well-being relative to those who do not engage in recreational activities. Aims: In this study, we examined whether engagement in health promoting activities, alone or with other family members, is associated with reduced levels of depression and enhanced levels of life satisfaction in unemployed individuals. Method: We employed a cross-sectional design in which we measured life satisfaction, depressive symptoms, consumption of healthy meals and engagement in physical activities in 203 unemployed individuals (male = 90, female = 113, age= 33.79, SD = 11.16). Results: Independent of age, gender, and partner employment status, hierarchical regression analyses revealed statistically significant effects for social forms of healthy eating (consumption of healthy meals with others) and solitary forms of physical activity (exercising alone) on depressive symptoms and life satisfaction. Limitations: The research design was cross-sectional using self-report questionnaires. The present study does not to explain why and how health promoting activities enhance well-being outcomes among the unemployed. Conclusions: These findings highlight the importance of measuring engagement in health promoting activities through separate constructs that capture engagement in social and solitary health promoting activities and suggest that unemployed individuals are likely to experience optimal levels of psychological well-being if they exercise alone and consume healthy meals with other family members.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherHogrefe & Huber Publishersen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto12en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalEuropean Journal of Health Psychologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume28en_US
dc.subject.keywordsSocial Sciencesen_US
dc.subject.keywordsPsychology, Clinicalen_US
dc.subject.keywordsPsychologyen_US
dc.subject.keywordspsychological well-beingen_US
dc.subject.keywordsphysical activityen_US
dc.titleRelationships Between Health Promoting Activities, Life Satisfaction, and Depressive Symptoms in Unemployed Individualsen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articlesen_US
dcterms.bibliographicCitationChatzisarantis, NLD; Kamarova, S; Twomey, C; Hansen, G; Harris, M; Windus, J; Bateson, A; Hagger, MS, Relationships Between Health Promoting Activities, Life Satisfaction, and Depressive Symptoms in Unemployed Individuals, European Journal of Health Psychology, 2021, 28 (1), pp. 1-12en_US
dc.date.updated2021-05-11T00:53:04Z
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript (AM)en_US
gro.rights.copyright© 2020 Hogrefe & Huber Publishers. This is the author-manuscript version of this paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. This article may not exactly replicate the final version published in European Journal of Health Psychology. It is not the version of record and is therefore not suitable for citation.en_US
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorHagger, Martin S.


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