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dc.contributor.authorCox-Witton, K
dc.contributor.authorBaker, ML
dc.contributor.authorEdson, D
dc.contributor.authorPeel, AJ
dc.contributor.authorWelbergen, JA
dc.contributor.authorField, H
dc.date.accessioned2021-05-25T01:31:33Z
dc.date.available2021-05-25T01:31:33Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.issn2352-7714en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.onehlt.2021.100247en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/404635
dc.description.abstractSARS-CoV-2, the cause of COVID-19, infected over 100 million people globally by February 2021. Reverse zoonotic transmission of SARS-CoV-2 from humans to other species has been documented in pet cats and dogs, big cats and gorillas in zoos, and farmed mink. As SARS-CoV-2 is closely related to known bat viruses, assessment of the potential risk of transmission of the virus from humans to bats, and its subsequent impacts on conservation and public health, is warranted. A qualitative risk assessment was conducted by a multi-disciplinary group to assess this risk in bats in the Australian context, with the aim of informing risk management strategies for human activities involving interactions with bats. The overall risk of SARS-CoV-2 establishing in an Australian bat population was assessed to be Low, however with a High level of uncertainty. The outcome of the assessment indicates that, for the Australian situation where the prevalence of COVID-19 in humans is very low, it is reasonable for research and rehabilitation of bats to continue, provided additional biosecurity measures are applied. Risk assessment is challenging for an emerging disease where information is lacking and the situation is changing rapidly; assessments should be revised if human prevalence or other important factors change significantly. The framework developed here, based on established animal disease risk assessment approaches adapted to assess reverse zoonotic transmission, has potential application to a range of wildlife species and situations.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.languageenen_US
dc.publisherElsevier BVen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom100247en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalOne Healthen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume13en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic Health and Health Servicesen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical Microbiologyen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1117en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1108en_US
dc.titleRisk of SARS-CoV-2 transmission from humans to bats – An Australian assessmenten_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articlesen_US
dcterms.bibliographicCitationCox-Witton, K; Baker, ML; Edson, D; Peel, AJ; Welbergen, JA; Field, H, Risk of SARS-CoV-2 transmission from humans to bats – An Australian assessment, One Health, 2021, 13, pp. 100247en_US
dcterms.licensehttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en_US
dc.date.updated2021-05-25T01:26:41Z
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)en_US
gro.rights.copyright© 2021 Published by Elsevier B.V. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) License, which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, providing that the work is properly cited.en_US
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorPeel, Alison J.


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