Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorBach, Aaron JE
dc.contributor.authorBorg, David N
dc.contributor.authorMinett, Geoffrey M
dc.contributor.authorMaley, Matthew J
dc.contributor.authorStewart, Ian B
dc.date.accessioned2021-05-30T23:29:04Z
dc.date.available2021-05-30T23:29:04Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.issn0925-7535
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ssci.2020.104980
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/404751
dc.description.abstractThe ASTM F2300-10 standard testing protocol was implemented for two continuous personal cooling systems (venturi air vest and cold-water perfused vest) with theoretically similar cooling capacities. Secondly, we used the same systems in step-wise increments of either temperature or relative humidity in order to define the upper limit of the prescriptive zone for each (i.e., critical environmental limits method). ASTM F2300-10 standard protocol saw both vests equally effective in reducing cardiovascular and thermal strain relative to a no cooling control. The critical environmental limits method saw the upper limit for humidity significantly increase in both vests, with no differences between the vests. However, the upper limit for temperature was increased in the cold-water vest, with the venturi air vest being no more beneficial than the control. Overall, this study used an evidence-based approach to demonstrate that a single environment, as per ASTM F2300-10, failed to delineate differences between continuous cooling systems promoting discrete mechanisms of heat loss. Most notably, relative to no cooling, the use of the air vest provided no additional evaporative cooling in a low humidity environment, and therefore no increase in the upper limits of critical temperature. This should highlight to end users not to assume that one size fits all for effective personal cooling systems if applied outside of the environment it was tested. Based on these findings, we suggest a range of environments be recommended by the ASTM F2300-10 standard for the evaluation of cooling systems to ensure systems ineffective in certain environments can be identified.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom104980
dc.relation.ispartofjournalSafety Science
dc.relation.ispartofvolume132
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEngineering
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical and Health Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology and Cognitive Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode09
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode11
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode17
dc.subject.keywordsScience & Technology
dc.subject.keywordsEngineering, Industrial
dc.subject.keywordsOperations Research & Management Science
dc.titleBiophysical, psychrometric and physiological limits for continuous liquid and air-based personal cooling systems in working men: A case for amending ASTM2300-10(2016)
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationBach, AJE; Borg, DN; Minett, GM; Maley, MJ; Stewart, IB, Biophysical, psychrometric and physiological limits for continuous liquid and air-based personal cooling systems in working men: A case for amending ASTM2300-10(2016), Safety Science, 2020, 132, pp. 104980
dc.date.updated2021-05-30T23:27:30Z
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorBorg, David
gro.griffith.authorBach, Aaron J.


Files in this item

FilesSizeFormatView

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record