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dc.contributor.authorZhou, KJ
dc.contributor.authorGraham, DJ
dc.contributor.authorLawson, RD
dc.contributor.authorSivakumar, BS
dc.date.accessioned2021-06-03T00:11:30Z
dc.date.available2021-06-03T00:11:30Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.issn1558-9447en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/1558944720988081en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/404888
dc.description.abstractVascularized joint transfer (VJT) from the proximal interphalangeal joint (PIPJ) of the toe is an attractive reconstructive option in cases of nonsalvageable finger PIPJ but is limited by equivocal functional outcomes. This systematic review aims to provide an update on vascularized toe-to-finger PIPJ transfers, examining functional outcomes, complications, and the latest refinements in operative technique. A systematic review of the available literature was performed according to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. Studies examining vascularized toe-to-finger PIPJ transfer for post-traumatic indications were included for analysis. Outcomes assessed included postoperative active range of motion, extension lag, and complications. Thirteen studies examining 210 VJTs were analyzed. Five VJTs experienced microsurgical failure giving an overall survival rate of 97.6%. Average postoperative PIPJ active range of motion (ROM) was 40.3° ± 12.9°, with an average extensor lag of 29° ± 10.5° and mean flexion of 68.9° ± 10.9°. For studies reporting complication outcomes, 59/162 complications were seen. No significant differences were seen between studies published prior to 2013 and after 2013 when comparing digital ROM (P =.123), flexion (P =.602), and extensor lag (P =.280). Studies using a reconstructive algorithm based on prior assessment of the donor toe central slip and recipient finger anatomy had significantly improved ROM outcomes (P =.013). Although VJT provides a reliable option for autologous reconstruction in posttraumatic joints, it is limited by impaired postoperative ROM. Careful assessment of the donor toe and recipient finger anatomy followed by systematic and meticulous reconstruction may lead to improved functional outcomes.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSAGE Publicationsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalHanden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Sciencesen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1103en_US
dc.subject.keywordshand surgeryen_US
dc.subject.keywordsjoint injuriesen_US
dc.subject.keywordsjoint reconstructionen_US
dc.subject.keywordsmicrovascular surgeryen_US
dc.subject.keywordsposttraumaticen_US
dc.titleToe-to-Finger Vascularized Joint Transfers for Proximal Interphalangeal Joint Reconstruction: A Systematic Reviewen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articlesen_US
dcterms.bibliographicCitationZhou, KJ; Graham, DJ; Lawson, RD; Sivakumar, BS, Toe-to-Finger Vascularized Joint Transfers for Proximal Interphalangeal Joint Reconstruction: A Systematic Review, Hand, 2021en_US
dc.date.updated2021-06-01T22:41:53Z
gro.description.notepublicThis publication has been entered in Griffith Research Online as an advanced online version.en_US
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorGraham, David J.


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