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dc.contributor.authorVincze, L
dc.contributor.authorBarnes, K
dc.contributor.authorSomerville, M
dc.contributor.authorLittlewood, R
dc.contributor.authorAtkins, H
dc.contributor.authorRogany, A
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, LT
dc.date.accessioned2021-06-07T01:46:46Z
dc.date.available2021-06-07T01:46:46Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.issn1475-9276
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s12939-021-01462-x
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/404952
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Indigenous populations throughout the world experience poorer health outcomes than non-indigenous people. The reasons for the health disparities are complex and due in part to historical treatment of Indigenous groups through colonisation. Evidence-based interventions aimed at improving health in this population need to be culturally safe. However, the extent to which cultural adaptation strategies are incorporated into the design and implementation of nutrition interventions designed for Indigenous peoples is unknown. The aim of this scoping review was to explore the cultural adaptation strategies used in the delivery of nutrition interventions for Indigenous populations worldwide. METHODS: Five health and medical databases were searched to January 2020. Interventions that included a nutrition component aimed at improving health outcomes among Indigenous populations that described strategies to enhance cultural relevance were included. The level of each cultural adaptation was categorised as evidential, visual, linguistic, constituent involving and/or socio-cultural with further classification related to cultural sensitivity (surface or deep). RESULTS: Of the 1745 unique records screened, 98 articles describing 66 unique interventions met the inclusion criteria, and were included in the synthesis. The majority of articles reported on interventions conducted in the USA, Canada and Australia, were conducted in the previous 10 years (n = 36) and focused on type 2 diabetes prevention (n = 19) or management (n = 7). Of the 66 interventions, the majority included more than one strategy to culturally tailor the intervention, combining surface and deep level adaptation approaches (n = 51), however, less than half involved Indigenous constituents at a deep level (n = 31). Visual adaptation strategies were the most commonly reported (n = 57). CONCLUSION: This paper is the first to characterise cultural adaptation strategies used in health interventions with a nutrition component for Indigenous peoples. While the majority used multiple cultural adaptation strategies, few focused on involving Indigenous constituents at a deep level. Future research should evaluate the effectiveness of cultural adaptation strategies for specific health outcomes. This could be used to inform co-design planning and implementation, ensuring more culturally appropriate methods are employed.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.sponsorshipChildrens Hospital Foundation Queensland
dc.languageeng
dc.publisherSpringer Science and Business Media LLC
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom125
dc.relation.ispartofissue1
dc.relation.ispartofjournalInternational journal for equity in health
dc.relation.ispartofvolume20
dc.subject.fieldofresearchHealth services and systems
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic health
dc.subject.fieldofresearchSociology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode4203
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode4206
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode4410
dc.subject.keywordsAboriginal
dc.subject.keywordsAdult
dc.subject.keywordsChild
dc.subject.keywordsCo-design
dc.subject.keywordsCommunity
dc.titleCultural adaptation of health interventions including a nutrition component in Indigenous peoples: a systematic scoping review
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationVincze, L; Barnes, K; Somerville, M; Littlewood, R; Atkins, H; Rogany, A; Williams, LT, Cultural adaptation of health interventions including a nutrition component in Indigenous peoples: a systematic scoping review, International journal for equity in health, 2021, 20 (1), pp. 125
dcterms.dateAccepted2021-04-29
dcterms.licensehttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.date.updated2021-06-06T20:16:02Z
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)
gro.rights.copyright© The Author(s). 2021. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorWilliams, Lauren T.
gro.griffith.authorLittlewood, Robyn
gro.griffith.authorVincze, Lisa J.
gro.griffith.authorSomerville, Mari
gro.griffith.authorBarnes, Katelyn A.


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