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dc.contributor.authorClarke, Laura
dc.contributor.authorArnett, Simon
dc.contributor.authorLilley, Kate
dc.contributor.authorLiao, Jacky
dc.contributor.authorBhuta, Sandeep
dc.contributor.authorBroadley, Simon A
dc.date.accessioned2021-06-09T05:21:10Z
dc.date.available2021-06-09T05:21:10Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.issn0009-9104
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/cei.13630
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/405034
dc.description.abstractNeuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD) is an inflammatory disease of the central nervous system (CNS) associated with antibodies to aquaporin-4 (AQP4) which has distinct clinical, radiological and pathological features, but also has some overlap with multiple sclerosis and MOG-antibody associated disease. Early recognition of NMOSD is important because of differing responses to both acute and preventive therapy. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has proven essential in this process. Key MR imaging clues to the diagnosis of NMOSD are longitudinally extensive lesions of the optic nerve (more than half the length) and spinal cord (3 or more vertebral segments), bilateral optic nerve lesions and lesions of the optic chiasm, area postrema, floor of the IV ventricle, periaqueductal grey matter, hypothalamus and walls of the III ventricle. Other NMOSD specific lesions are denoted by their unique morphology: heterogeneous lesions of the corpus callosum, "cloud-like" Gd-enhancing white matter lesions and "bright spotty" lesions of the spinal cord. Other lesions described in NMOSD, including linear periventricular periependymal lesions and patch subcortical white matter lesions, may be less specific. The use of advanced MR imaging techniques is yielding further useful information about focal degeneration of the thalamus and optic radiation in NMOSD and suggests that paramagnetic rim patterns and changes in normal appearing white matter are specific to MS. MR imaging is crucial in the early recognition of NMOSD and in directing testing for AQP4 antibodies and guiding immediate acute treatment decisions. Increasingly MR imaging is playing a role in diagnosing seronegative cases of NMOSD.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageeng
dc.publisherWiley
dc.relation.ispartofjournalClinical & Experimental Immunology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchImmunology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1107
dc.subject.keywordsDiagnosis
dc.subject.keywordsMagnetic resonance imaging
dc.subject.keywordsMultiple sclerosis
dc.subject.keywordsNeuromyelitis optica
dc.titleMagnetic resonance imaging in neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationClarke, L; Arnett, S; Lilley, K; Liao, J; Bhuta, S; Broadley, SA, Magnetic resonance imaging in neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder, Clinical & Experimental Immunology, 2021
dc.date.updated2021-06-09T05:15:18Z
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript (AM)
gro.rights.copyright© 2021 British Society for Immunology. This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Magnetic resonance imaging in neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder, Clinical & Experimental Immunology, 2021, which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1111/cei.13630. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving (http://olabout.wiley.com/WileyCDA/Section/id-828039.html)
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorClarke, Laura
gro.griffith.authorBhuta, Sandeep
gro.griffith.authorArnett, Simon
gro.griffith.authorBroadley, Simon
gro.griffith.authorLilley, Kathleen


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