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dc.contributor.authorCarden, C
dc.date.accessioned2021-06-14T00:20:17Z
dc.date.available2021-06-14T00:20:17Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.issn0030-9230
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/00309230.2021.1924808
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/405100
dc.description.abstractIn 1900, the Westbrook Reformatory for Boys, an institution holding both young people convicted of criminal offences and those deemed to be neglected children, was established in a farming region in Queensland, Australia. The institution would remain in the same location until 1994. By then, it had been rebranded as a Youth Detention Centre, housing teenagers convicted of crimes or on remand rather than the original mix of neglected and offending children and young people. In the institution's earliest stages, rurality and agricultural labour, were central to its work. By the century's end, Westbrook’s rural setting, its distance from the capital city, and its inclusion of a working farm were key contributing factors to its closure. Drawing on archival data, newspaper records, memoirs of former inmates, and the findings of three inquiries into the institution, this essay seeks to explain how and why rurality, perceived as central to projects of moral reform in 1900, became understood primarily through the lens of inconvenience and danger by 1994. In doing so, it argues that the moral and rehabilitative discourses associated with rurality did not necessarily become obsolete or irrelevant by the end of the twentieth century. Instead, they interacted with shifting cultural expectations about the treatment of institutionalised children, as well as changing economic circumstances, creating a situation in which the perceived value of rurality alone was insufficient to justify the continued presence of a youth justice institution at Westbrook.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageen
dc.publisherInforma UK Limited
dc.relation.ispartofjournalPaedagogica Historica
dc.subject.fieldofresearchSpecialist Studies in Education
dc.subject.fieldofresearchHistorical Studies
dc.subject.fieldofresearchHistory and Philosophy of Specific Fields
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1303
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode2103
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode2202
dc.titleThe uses of rurality in twentieth-century youth justice: an Australian case study, 1900-1994
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationCarden, C, The uses of rurality in twentieth-century youth justice: an Australian case study, 1900-1994, Paedagogica Historica, 2021
dc.date.updated2021-06-14T00:00:16Z
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript (AM)
gro.description.notepublicThis publication has been entered in Griffith Research Online as an advanced online version.
gro.rights.copyrightThis is an Author's Accepted Manuscript of an article published in Paedagogica Historica, 2021, copyright Taylor & Francis, available online at: https://doi.org/10.1080/00309230.2021.1924808
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorCarden, Clarissa J.


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