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dc.contributor.authorNikles, Jane
dc.contributor.authorKeijzers, Gerben
dc.contributor.authorMitchell, Geoffrey
dc.contributor.authorFarrell, Scott F
dc.contributor.authorPerez, Siegfried
dc.contributor.authorSchug, Stephan
dc.contributor.authorWare, Robert S
dc.contributor.authorMcLean, Samuel A
dc.contributor.authorConnelly, Luke B
dc.contributor.authorSterling, Michele
dc.date.accessioned2021-06-15T23:18:32Z
dc.date.available2021-06-15T23:18:32Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.issn0304-3959
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/j.pain.0000000000002362
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/405155
dc.description.abstractThere are few effective treatments for acute whiplash-associated disorders (WAD). Early features of central sensitisation predict poor recovery. The effect of pregabalin on central sensitisation might prevent chronic pain after acute whiplash injury. This double blind, placebo-controlled randomised controlled trial (RCT) examined feasibility and potential effectiveness of pregabalin compared to placebo for people with acute WAD. Twenty-four participants with acute WAD (<48 hours) and at risk of poor recovery (pain ≥ 5/10) were recruited from hospital Emergency Departments in Queensland, Australia and randomly assigned by concealed allocation to either pregabalin (n=10) or placebo (n=14). Pregabalin was commenced at 75 mg bd, titrated to 300 mg bd for 4 weeks, and then weaned over 1 week. Participants were assessed at 5 weeks, 3, 6 and 12 months. Feasibility issues included recruitment difficulties and greater attrition in the placebo group. For the primary clinical outcome of neck pain intensity, attrition at 5 weeks was: pregabalin: 10%, placebo: 36%, and at 12 months was: pregabalin: 10%, placebo: 43%. Pregabalin may be more effective than placebo for the primary clinical outcome of neck pain intensity at 3 months [Mean Difference: -4.0 (95% CI -6.2 to -1.7)] on an eleven point numerical rating scale. Effects were maintained at 6 but not 12 months. There were no serious adverse events. Minor adverse events were more common in the pregabalin group. A definitive large RCT of pregabalin for acute whiplash injury is warranted. Feasibility issues would need to be addressed with modifications to the protocol.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageeng
dc.publisherOvid Technologies (Wolters Kluwer Health)
dc.relation.ispartofjournalPain
dc.subject.fieldofresearchBiomedical and clinical sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode32
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode52
dc.titlePregabalin versus placebo to prevent chronic pain after whiplash injury in at-risk individuals: results of a feasibility study for a large randomised controlled trial.
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationNikles, J; Keijzers, G; Mitchell, G; Farrell, SF; Perez, S; Schug, S; Ware, RS; McLean, SA; Connelly, LB; Sterling, M, Pregabalin versus placebo to prevent chronic pain after whiplash injury in at-risk individuals: results of a feasibility study for a large randomised controlled trial., Pain, 2021
dc.date.updated2021-06-15T03:57:46Z
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript (AM)
gro.description.notepublicThis publication has been entered in Griffith Research Online as an advanced online version.
gro.rights.copyright© 2021 LWW. This is a non-final version of an article published in final form in Pain 2021. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal link for access to the definitive, published version.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorFarrell, Scott F.
gro.griffith.authorKeijzers, Gerben
gro.griffith.authorWare, Robert


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